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drpete3

Supreme Member

Posts: 375

Location: USA

11

Wednesday, February 25th 2004, 2:30am

The other thing your pump guy will need to know is how deep your water table is and how deep you are installing your pump if submersible.
Thanks,

Pete

mugentuner

Advanced Member

Posts: 88

Location: FL

12

Wednesday, February 25th 2004, 9:42am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by rain man</i>
<br />You should decide on a maximum design capacity (total gpm) to each zone and desired operating pressure, rotors run well around 40psi, while spray heads run fine around 30 psi, and take that information to the pump dealer. They will size you up correctly based on this information. You can then use the same pump size no matter how many zones you have because you will run only 1 zone at a time with a total flow rate that is the same (or very close) for each zone.
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Cool, what if my lawn will need 3 zones to water later on (probably 30 psi each)? Would I only run one at a time to accomplish this goal or could I run all 3 zones one time with the right pump? Just trying to get a feel for the flow rates e.t.c. Thanks

rain man

Active Member

13

Wednesday, February 25th 2004, 4:41pm

You can run 3 zones, (technically would be 1 zone if run at the same time), but you will have to change your pump if you add more later. Plus you'll probably need a 30 gpm pump (3 x 10 gpm/zone) to do that and that starts to get costly $$$. My suggestion..size your pump for 1 zone, put in control valves for each zone..don't try to run everything at the same time...that way you can put in a hundred zones and use the same pump.

-rain man

mugentuner

Advanced Member

Posts: 88

Location: FL

14

Thursday, February 26th 2004, 2:00am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by rain man</i>
<br />You can run 3 zones, (technically would be 1 zone if run at the same time), but you will have to change your pump if you add more later. Plus you'll probably need a 30 gpm pump (3 x 10 gpm/zone) to do that and that starts to get costly $$$. My suggestion..size your pump for 1 zone, put in control valves for each zone..don't try to run everything at the same time...that way you can put in a hundred zones and use the same pump.

-rain man
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Yeah, you're not kidding. Pumps can be big $. I'm thinking to get an efficient pump to at least handle one zone at a time.

mugentuner

Advanced Member

Posts: 88

Location: FL

15

Tuesday, March 2nd 2004, 4:08am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by mugentuner</i>
<br /><blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by rain man</i>
<br />You can run 3 zones, (technically would be 1 zone if run at the same time), but you will have to change your pump if you add more later. Plus you'll probably need a 30 gpm pump (3 x 10 gpm/zone) to do that and that starts to get costly $$$. My suggestion..size your pump for 1 zone, put in control valves for each zone..don't try to run everything at the same time...that way you can put in a hundred zones and use the same pump.

-rain man
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Yeah, you're not kidding. Pumps can be big $. I'm thinking to get an efficient pump to at least handle one zone at a time.
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Alright guys,

I've mapped out my first zone, GPM requirements. I will have to cover a 56' x 36' (2016 sq.feet) front lawn for the first zone. I figure I will need to use:
4 - 15' throw @ 30 psi, rainbird sprayheads (half-pattern) at 1.85 GPM each.
2- 15' throw @ 30 psi, rainbird sprayheads (full pattern) at 3.70 gpm each. All for head to head coverage.

According to my calculations, this comes up to around 22 GPM for the complete zone (6 heads x each respective gpm per sprayer). This sounds like a high GPM requirement to me! Could someone possibly advise me if this is the best, efficient setup for this zone and help me size the correct well pump? I'd really appreciate it. [:)]

drpete3

Supreme Member

Posts: 375

Location: USA

16

Tuesday, March 2nd 2004, 6:43am

22 gpm is alot. Consider rotors and you can redesign with a lower gpm. Or split that into 2 zones and you will need 11 gpm but more cost due to 2 zones. I would do rotors.
Thanks,

Pete

mugentuner

Advanced Member

Posts: 88

Location: FL

17

Tuesday, March 2nd 2004, 6:48am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by drpete3</i>
<br />22 gpm is alot. Consider rotors and you can redesign with a lower gpm. Or split that into 2 zones and you will need 11 gpm but more cost due to 2 zones. I would do rotors.
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Man,
The only problem i have with that is that I already purchased these spray heads with the advice of a Lowe's rep. If I do split the lawn into two zones, I will in turn have 3 zones just in the front yard (2 zones for lawn, one for plants, shrubbery). Edit: Ok, i've decided to go with the rotors with this zone. What rainbird rotors would you recommend that I go for that will yeild an efficient GPM with spacing no more than about 15' apart? T-Series or new 3500 series (looks best). Thanks

aquamatic

Advanced Member

Posts: 230

Location: USA

18

Tuesday, March 2nd 2004, 8:40am

No problem! Lowes has a pretty good return policy!
Let some of these guys in this forum direct you to what you should use. Get it from Sprinkler Warehouse or locate a local Irrigation SUpply house that have people that know irrigation.

mugentuner

Advanced Member

Posts: 88

Location: FL

19

Tuesday, March 2nd 2004, 9:56am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by aquamatic</i>
<br />No problem! Lowes has a pretty good return policy!
Let some of these guys in this forum direct you to what you should use. Get it from Sprinkler Warehouse or locate a local Irrigation SUpply house that have people that know irrigation.
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Thanks, what rotors should I go with (15' spacing)? The new 3500 series rotors from Rainbird look really nice. Let me know.

rain man

Active Member

20

Tuesday, March 2nd 2004, 3:09pm

Based on your zone flow rates you have 15gpm not 22gpm. You may not need to split, provided your well and pump can deliver at least this amount. Remember that if you are running from a well through a pump w/out a pressure tank, whether you do 15gpm or 7.5gpm,all your zones will need to be approximately the same flow rate to keep your pump from cycling and wearing out. At 15ft. spacing you are borderline of spray heads versus rotors. You will definetly use sprays on the shrubs, I prefer Hunter Pro series with the 8" or 12" risers for shrubs. For the yard it is your call, sounds like you are going with rotors, you'll impress the neighbors more with rotors, but they cost more too. Rotors I use are Hunter PGP or I-20 if the terrain is not level. You can order through sprinkler warehouse.

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