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JohnnyG101

Active Member

Posts: 13

Location: USA

1

Tuesday, October 10th 2006, 5:30am

Need a reccomendation

I purchased a home recently and the idiot who installed the system did not install any type if back flow prevention. He did it all himself and used all inline valves (14 of them)going into 4 valve boxes.

Do I need to replace the inline valves with Automatic Anti-Siphon Valves such as a DAS/ASVF-075? or can I just install something on the line before it hits any of the valve boxes?

Thanks

HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

2

Tuesday, October 10th 2006, 7:55am

Unless local codes require Anit-siphon valves, you just need to install a PVB, DC, or RPZ upstream of all the valves. Which one of these are allowed is also dependand upon local codes. Local codes will also dictact whether you can do the work yourself or if a certified plumber is required.

JohnnyG101

Active Member

Posts: 13

Location: USA

3

Tuesday, October 10th 2006, 8:08am

Thanks....I am hoping I do not need the Anti-Siphon Valves.

JohnnyG101

Active Member

Posts: 13

Location: USA

4

Tuesday, October 10th 2006, 10:53am

I was told that all I needed was an RPZ. Can anyone make a reccomendation on which to get?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,880

Location: Metro NYC

5

Tuesday, October 10th 2006, 12:45pm

An RPZ will subtract 10-15 psi from your operating pressure. That's enough to affect performance. If elevation allows installation higher than any sprinkler head, then a Pressure Vacuum Breaker is a better choice. Cheaper, too.

JohnnyG101

Active Member

Posts: 13

Location: USA

6

Tuesday, October 10th 2006, 12:56pm

The height is no issue at all. Also, it doesnt look like the dude installed a drain valve either.

This is needed no? How else could I drain the main line before it hits any valves right?

HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

7

Wednesday, October 11th 2006, 6:16am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by JohnnyG101</i>
<br />I was told that all I needed was an RPZ. Can anyone make a reccomendation on which to get?
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

An RPZ is what is considered the "strongest" of backflow options (i.e. most reliable at preventing backflow, almost no codes would ever prohibit its use). But as Wet_Boots points out, installing an RPZ could affect your systems performance because it's going to rob the system of 10-15psi operation pressure.

You might want to check with codes again and see if a lower-end backflow option is available. Again, as Wet_Boots points out, a PVB will steel less operating pressure from the system. I believe MOST building codes allow PVBs, but it has to be installed above the highest sprinkler head (RPZ only has to be installed above ground, relative position to rest of irrigation system doesn't mater).

The third option (and more likely to be disallowed by local codes than the PVB) is a DC (double check). Don't confuse this with a double check valve. A DC backflow preventer has test cocks with it so that after it has been installed, each check valve can be independently tested for proper operation. There is no way to verify that each check valve is working properly in a double check valve. A DC is considered the least safe option (and not recommended if anything is injected into the system such as a fertigation system). However it has the benefit that it can be installed just about anywhere. This would include a basement or underground in a meter box. An RPZ can't be installed in a basement (unless you have adequate drainage for the water that can spew from the device) and you can't install it underground (it can't be located such that the device becomes submerged should it start releasing water to prevent backflow).


<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by JohnnyG101</i>
<br />The height is no issue at all. Also, it doesnt look like the dude installed a drain valve either.

This is needed no? How else could I drain the main line before it hits any valves right?
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
While installing the backflow, you can install a blowout port (AFTER the backflow preventer). The blowout port would allow you to connect an air compressor to the system and blow all the water out of the irrigation system (winterizing).

JohnnyG101

Active Member

Posts: 13

Location: USA

8

Sunday, October 15th 2006, 8:11am

Thanks for the info. I am probably going to install this in the spring.

The previous owner never installed any drains so without the backflow or drains, I have no clue how I am going to winterize this thing. I was told the 3 years the other guy lived here, he never winterized....

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,880

Location: Metro NYC

9

Sunday, October 15th 2006, 11:33am

Shut the entire house off, and run the air through an existing hose bib.

JohnnyG101

Active Member

Posts: 13

Location: USA

10

Tuesday, October 17th 2006, 2:51pm

I spoke to the city again, and the RPZ is REQUIRED. And has to be installed by a licensed professional. So I guess am I out of luck doing this myself.

I am hearing conflicting accounts on the pressure loss after this is installed. Some say 10-15 and other say no more then 7. Well which is it? The idiot only used 3/4" PVC as well. Im so screwed.

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