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ChrisSanDiego

Unregistered

1

Monday, October 31st 2016, 1:26pm

Need help w/ Uphill Sprinkler Heads & Anti Siphon Valves

Hi:

Moved into new house about 3 years ago w/ pre-installed irrigation system. Recently started getting a lot of water coming out of 2 anti-siphon valves that control uphill sprinkler heads. Those sprinkler heads are on a bank that sits about 10' above grade, approx. 60' away from the house where the valves and sprinkler control system sits. After reading this forum, I now know this is against code and generally a bad idea, and that back flow is likely what is causing the anti-siphon valves to leak (do their jobs). Given the anti-siphon valves are so close to the foundation, I'd prefer not to have that much water coming out every time the sprinklers run. It appears I have two options:

1. Raise those 2 anti siphon valves to about 12' off grade. This seems absurd though - am I crazy?

2. Install an RPZ and convert to inline valves. I saw this reco on a similar question posted here. However, in researching RPZ options, they seem to recommend they be installed 12" above highest sprinkler as well? So not sure this solves my issue. Secondly, there will be 5 or 6 remaining zones that currently feed sprinklers that are below the anti siphon valves and are functioning normally - would I have to replace those as well?

If it is of any help, I do plan to convert those uphill sprinklers into a drip system, so I am making a broad assumption the pressure loss from the RPZ may be mitigated.

Is there a third option I didn't consider? Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
Chris

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,145

Location: Metro NYC

2

Monday, October 31st 2016, 5:07pm

There is no elevation requirement for the RPZ relative to any pipes or sprinklers. It just has to be a good foot or more above grade, so it can drain freely.

You have noticed there is additional pressure drop with the RPZ, so its effect on sprinkler pressure has to be taken into account.

ChrisSanDiego

Unregistered

3

Monday, October 31st 2016, 6:08pm

Thank you Wet_Boots.

I noticed the schematic design on the product page that it had to be above the highest sprinkler head. Is that incorrect? Or maybe I'm looking at the wrong product?

Would you say this is the best route to take? I don't have an RPZ yet so haven't noticed any change in pressure - just guessing.

Chris

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,145

Location: Metro NYC

4

Monday, October 31st 2016, 7:20pm

Definitely an incorrect diagram. Good catch.

About pressure. If you did have pressure worries, and didn't want to chance loss of performance with an RPZ, you could relocate the out-of-position anti-syphon valves to the top of the slope. Run control wire to the top of the slope, and there have the valves, higher than what they feed.

ChrisSanDiego

Unregistered

5

Tuesday, November 1st 2016, 4:35pm

Thanks again... major help.

In researching these RPZ's, it seems like a pretty major undertaiking for a residential install... would you do the anti-siphon operation instead?

Thanks!
Chris

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,145

Location: Metro NYC

6

Tuesday, November 1st 2016, 5:34pm

When properties slope high uphill of the water supply, the RPZ is what gets installed. It's been that way ever since toxic-rated sprinkler backflow protection has come to be required. That said, a retrofit like yours will be a lot cheaper with some wire run to the top of the slope. Since SoCal sprinkler zones are plumbed with PVC pipe and fittings, zone pipes can become supply lines to the relocated antisyphon valves.

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