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Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,287

Location: Metro NYC

11

Wednesday, August 12th 2015, 3:40am

You can take some resistance measurements now, with one lead of the ohmmeter touching the common terminal, and the other lead on a zone terminal. Between 20-60 ohms is normal. You might spot a bad solenoid with a very low ohms reading.

The idea is to identify what caused the fuse to blow.

varuscelli

New Member

Posts: 13

Location: Pearland, Texas

12

Wednesday, August 12th 2015, 12:41pm

I'm sure glad I came here for advice.

All I had to do was replace the fuse and all is well again. Can't believe my thinking got twisted around to disregard that, even when I was looking right at it.

We have had a lot of power outages here over the last few months (neighborhood wide). On at least a weekly basis, we have very short losses of only a few seconds at a time, but we've also had several that lasted for hours at a time. There's a of new home construction going on here and that might be part of the reason for the brief outages, but we've also had other non-construction-related outage problems that the local power company has been working to resolve.

I'm thinking that possibly one of the brief outages we had a few days ago might have been the last straw for that fuse (just speculating). However, in the six or so years from the sprinkler system's installation, we've never had a controller fuse go out (despite all the outages, etc.), so this is a first.

I'll do a bit of further checking now and keep a close eye out for it blowing a fuse again, too.

Again, thank you for all your help in this. :thumbup:

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,287

Location: Metro NYC

13

Wednesday, August 12th 2015, 9:41pm

A perfectly good sprinkler system might still blow a controller fuse, if a voltage spike appears.

Central Irrigation

Supreme Member

Posts: 371

Location: Central Minnesota

14

Thursday, August 13th 2015, 11:47am

MrFixit for the win!

varuscelli

New Member

Posts: 13

Location: Pearland, Texas

15

Saturday, August 15th 2015, 1:26pm

Well, I'm back again. The system ran fine for a couple of days after replacing the fuse, but today it is back to apparently only internal battery power (LCD display showing PR OFF again). I tried a new fuse, even though the other one I had put in seemed good. Nothing changed with the new fuse.

Interestingly, the plugged-in transformer is now cold to the touch whereas before it had always been at least slightly warm. I'm not sure what my ability to test anything else in the controller would be at this point.

I'm thinking my next step is to change out the transformer and see what happens -- unless I get a more likely suggestion as to what to look for or try to test at this point... :)

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "varuscelli" (Aug 15th 2015, 2:21pm)


varuscelli

New Member

Posts: 13

Location: Pearland, Texas

16

Saturday, August 15th 2015, 4:31pm

OK -- replaced the old transformer with a new one and we are back in business.

Again, many thanks for the help and advice!

My wife says "Thank you" too. :)

varuscelli

New Member

Posts: 13

Location: Pearland, Texas

17

Sunday, August 16th 2015, 11:55pm

Argh.

The new transformer lasted for about 24 hours before it failed, too.

I am at a loss. :(

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,287

Location: Metro NYC

18

Monday, August 17th 2015, 5:43am

If your replacement fuse is correctly sized, it should blow long before the transformer's own internal fuse gives out.

varuscelli

New Member

Posts: 13

Location: Pearland, Texas

19

Monday, August 17th 2015, 8:57am

If your replacement fuse is correctly sized, it should blow long before the transformer's own internal fuse gives out.

Thanks, Wet_Boots.

The previous fuse was 3 Amp 250 Volt and I replaced it with 3 Amp 250 Volt (fast blow fuse). I tested the fuse and it tested as still good after the transformer failed.

I wonder if it's possible that I just got a defective transformer?

The transformer worked briefly (about a day...but might have failed during the sprinkling cycle; I'm not sure since I set it all to run starting at 1 a.m. -- I watched the system start but didn't watch the entire cycle, and by the time I noticed the transformer was not working it was many hours past the cycle time and I couldn't tell if all zones had been watered).

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,287

Location: Metro NYC

20

Monday, August 17th 2015, 9:50am

The fuse is supposed to be one-half amp, according to the manual. You need a pack of new fuses (normally five per pack) of the correct value and also a new transformer. If you don't want to run out of fuses right away, you also need to do a resistance test of each zone, to find out which one(s) have a solenoid short circuit.

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