You are not logged in.

Dear visitor, welcome to SPRINKLER TALK FORUM - You Got Questions, We've Got Answers. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains how this page works. You must be registered before you can use all the page's features. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

njitgrad

Active Member

Posts: 36

Location: NJ

1

Wednesday, January 28th 2015, 8:39am

PVB froze

In 2013 I had a new Watts 800M4 PVB installed by a local irrigation company and it worked fine for the remainder of 2013 and all of 2014. I have the irrigation system winterized professionally every season. I just noticed yesterday that the winterization was probably not done very well this time because the cap for my PVB valve seemed to be askew. When I removed the cap I can see the spring expanded due to ice. Is this something that can easily be repaired? Shouldn't the irrigation company that did the winterizing be responsible for the repair? Should I take any action to have this repaired now or wait until Spring?






Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,147

Location: Metro NYC

2

Wednesday, January 28th 2015, 10:43am

Shutoff valves can fail, and some systems get cared for with this possibility in mind. Some do not. Your's is the latter, but the primary fault occurs in the house, as either a failed shutoff valve, or human error (it happens) sends water into the outdoor plumbing.

Nobody who winterizes a system is providing any guarantee against the indoor plumbing allowing water to get outside.

njitgrad

Active Member

Posts: 36

Location: NJ

3

Wednesday, January 28th 2015, 1:10pm

The shutoff valve inside my house is in the closed position. It's a 1/4 turn ball valve. I closed it before they blew the lines out.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "njitgrad" (Jan 28th 2015, 1:25pm)


Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,147

Location: Metro NYC

4

Wednesday, January 28th 2015, 7:02pm

Since when does a ball valve being in the closed position mean that absolutely zero water can pass through it? There are some things you can't take on faith, and ball valves are one of them.

njitgrad

Active Member

Posts: 36

Location: NJ

5

Thursday, January 29th 2015, 9:17am

Agreed. So how can I rule out the ball valve leaking?

Assuming it is a ball valve leak....would this have happened if the valves on the PVB were in the closed position or would the pipes leading up to the PVB have burst instead?

Should I look into repairing this now or wait until Spring? I could always melt the ice with a hot air gun and siphon out any water (assuming I disassemble the PVB valve).

Regarding the PVB itself, is it repairable?

- EDIT-

I just had a telephone conversation with a (very knowledgeable) rep from Watts and he said it most likely was not winterized properly. In addition the two valves on the PVB should have been left in the 45 degree position. He also said that brass malforms when put under intense pressure like this and the PVB will have to be completely replaced.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "njitgrad" (Jan 29th 2015, 9:27am)


Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,147

Location: Metro NYC

6

Thursday, January 29th 2015, 7:10pm

the Watts rep has a point, although it is entirely possible that the valve handles were put in that 45-degree position during winterizing, before the handles were returned to their normal position, although I wouldn't count on it - in any event, ball valve damage isn't a given, even though you want to allow for the possibility

in any event, wait for warmer (above-freezing) weather, then open that blue-handled drain valve, and turn the green handles to 45 degrees

repair is possible, since the construction of the central section will have the plastic innards breaking before the brass can crack or warp - it may or may not be cost-effective to have it repaired (should be less than $200 parts and labor in your area, if the ball valves aren't damaged)

winterizing never places a guarantee on an existing ball valve - if an existing system configuration allows, a good winterizing would leave handles turned in a way that could provide a measure of protection against a slow leak sending water into the outdoor sprinkler plumbing - but that sort of winterizing is not standard issue

Similar threads

Rate this thread