You are not logged in.

Dear visitor, welcome to SPRINKLER TALK FORUM - You Got Questions, We've Got Answers. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains how this page works. You must be registered before you can use all the page's features. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

BTH3346

New Member

1

Saturday, August 6th 2005, 4:44pm

Type of Sprinkler recommendation?

What type of sprinkler would you recommend for 8' diameter bed areas containing annuals with flowering pear trees in the center? There are 4 on each side of the driveway and will be on separate 1" mains teed off a 1" main at 50 PSI off of a submersible pump system. Should I put a backflow valve prior to the T or put one on each after the T? Also, we are in PA (southcentral)and our freeze line can get down to 24" during bad winters. Do you recommend that all mains and laterals at 30"? It seems that the system will have to be blown out in the fall no matter what depth unless drains are installed on every sprinkler. Is this correct or is there another solution? Also does the valve boxes need to be the same depth as the main line and if so are there boxes made this deep for a cover near the sod surface? Thanks for any help!! [:)]

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,063

Location: Metro NYC

2

Saturday, August 6th 2005, 5:01pm

Blow out the water, and you don't have to worry about depth. If all you want to water are the beds, use drip irrigation, since regular sprinklers are mostly for larger areas.

BTH3346

New Member

3

Saturday, August 6th 2005, 5:28pm

Will the drip system work for fertilization as well? We irrigate now with hose end sprinklers and/or nozzles plus hand mixing fert and manual application. These 8 tree/annual beds are only one part of a new irrigation design in the early stage. The story is it takes approx. 1-2 hours per manual irrigation for the whole property. This is about 1-2 hours too much!!!

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,063

Location: Metro NYC

4

Saturday, August 6th 2005, 7:52pm

Long term, the sprinkler answer for the beds is nothing. A lawn sprinkler system can sweep water over annuals and lawngrass simultaneously, and once the trees are established, they will get their water from deeper than the sprinkling will penetrate.

As for fertilizer in the sprinkler systems, I would say don't do it. If you wouldn't sprinkle it on your cornflakes, you don't want it in your drinking water. And it is your drinking water that is (usually) flowing into your sprinkler system. Yes, there are backflow preventers, but there are also device failures.

BTH3346

New Member

5

Sunday, August 7th 2005, 9:57am

OK. Thanks for the suggestions WetBoots. It sounds like we will keep the system shallow at 6" and plan on blowing out the system in the fall. This will make going over the many services on the property much easier(gas, electric, sewer, phone, roof and basement SCH 40 drain). Additionally it sounds like we might get away with all drip for round and houseline beds. We will simply put in hydrants at the terminal ends of 1" for hose (Peters) fert. application. Your timely suggestions will help us save valuable time and money!!

Jazzer K

Active Member

Posts: 37

Location: USA

6

Friday, September 2nd 2005, 6:38pm

you could either go with Hunter pro sprays from 4" to 12" or hunter micro -sprays that only spray 4"- 18". I would not use drip if you like to transplant though, because you will be cutting that drip every time you put a shovel in the ground.
Kasper's Landscape & Design Inc.

Jazzer K

Active Member

Posts: 37

Location: USA

7

Friday, September 2nd 2005, 6:41pm

another reason not to do it is that your yard sprinklers have to be spaced evenly and perfectly, if they arent you will have green spots where they overlap and you will have brown spots if it gets windy and uneven.
Kasper's Landscape & Design Inc.

Jazzer K

Active Member

Posts: 37

Location: USA

8

Friday, September 2nd 2005, 6:43pm

You will want it at a minimum of 10" just to be sure of freeze and thaw, and if you aerate you dont want to hit one of the lines.
Kasper's Landscape & Design Inc.

Rate this thread