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herrtodd

New Member

Posts: 2

Location: California

1

Sunday, September 17th 2017, 7:14pm

Help with identifying Hardie valve

Hi, I'm trying to figure out what 1" Hardie valve I have so I can buy a replacement diaphragm. I've looked at the various sprinkler supply stores, and I haven't found a diagram that matches -- especially with the protrusion underneath the valve.

Images of the valve can be found here: https://imgur.com/a/yepv4 -- Any help would be appreciated!

It appears that the solenoid has been replaced at least once already, since that has the Orbit brand on it. I'm reticent to cut out the valve and replace it since I have very little room on the upstream side to work with, and digging those valves out of the dirt around them has been quite a chore. As you can see, I had to pull the valve box out of the ground to be able get at the valve at all. I'd also be happy to hear any suggestions for how to put a box back more intelligently -- whoever did the drip upgrade looks to have just cut a hole in the side of it.

Thanks!

mrfixit

Moderator

Posts: 1,988

Location: USA

2

Sunday, September 17th 2017, 9:50pm

That's a HR1 valve

Just swapping out the diaphragm doesn't always work on that valve. Sometimes you need a retrofit kit.

But try the diaphragm might work. Your call. You could put a diaphragm in there from another working valve to see if that fixes it.

Also it might now work with that Orbit solenoid.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,123

Location: Metro NYC

3

Monday, September 18th 2017, 9:16am

As a contrast to repairing that valve, a pro would be more likely to remove the old valve and thread a new one into place, using a telescoping "slip-fix" coupling on the output side.

herrtodd

New Member

Posts: 2

Location: California

4

Monday, September 18th 2017, 12:51pm

Thanks for the pointers, I appreciate it.

mrfixit: I've seen that I can purchase both the bonnet and diaphragm -- is that what constitutes a retrofit?

I've contacted a couple of pros to see what it will cost to have them replace the valve. I think I could do it myself, but after buying the tools, I'm probably about even once you factor in time and quality of workmanship from me. :)

Thanks again!

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,123

Location: Metro NYC

5

Monday, September 18th 2017, 2:30pm

One important point is that some old valves are subject to internal cracks in the valve body itself, and the entire valve needs replaced. So if you have a leaking valve that just won't shut off 100%, replacement might be the only choice.

mrfixit

Moderator

Posts: 1,988

Location: USA

6

Monday, September 18th 2017, 8:32pm

If you use a telescoping coupling make sure it's extended all the way. I've seen those installed where once the water's turned on the coupling expands and stresses out the manifold.

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