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Tuesday, June 13th 2017, 7:52am

Toro Vision II problem (blown fuse)

Hi There, I hope you guys/gals can help me.
Our house has TORO Vision II controller (7 zones connected). Been working for years without a problem. Yesterday I noticed after sprinklers went off in the morning, after a few zones were covered the controller went dead. I double checked electric outlet, making sure I still have the power. Then, unplugged and took the cover off, and checked fuses. There are 2 old fashion capsule fuses in the upper left corner of the printed wiring board (F1 and F2). Both have 1.5A (250Vac) rated fuses where Fuse #2 was burned. Fuse #1 was ok. So, I stopped at Lowes, got replacement (they only have 1A and 2A replacement, figured to get 2A). Popped the fuse back in and everything seems to work. Turned the system on, started again, and after a few zones - the same F2 burned out.
Looks like the fuse is the only problem, because once I replace it everything works for a little while until something shorts it again. The system is not that old, I mean we have been in this house for 6+ years and previous owners had new sprinkler system installed not too long before selling their house.
So, any idea what's going on? Any suggestions, please? Do you guys think it's an issue with a controller, the board? I mean, it's not dead since I can make it work with a fuse replacement, but it then shorts out. Could be related to a specific zone? Anything else? I would like to figure out how to fix it myself before calling in service.
Thanks!!!!!
PS could it be something like a bad solenoid related to a specific zone? I just googled it and it came up with "solenoid" issue. Is there one solenoid per zone?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,145

Location: Metro NYC

2

Tuesday, June 13th 2017, 8:49am

First off, go to an electrical supply house, if you can't find the exact fuse. You never replace with a larger value, when you can't find an exact match. You go with a lower value, and protect the circuitry.

Outside of that, you got a shorted solenoid, and you have to replace it.

3

Tuesday, June 13th 2017, 10:43am

First off, go to an electrical supply house, if you can't find the exact fuse. You never replace with a larger value, when you can't find an exact match. You go with a lower value, and protect the circuitry.

Outside of that, you got a shorted solenoid, and you have to replace it.
Thanks! Will get down to troubleshooting which one failed. I assume just need to measure resistance across every zone connection to find the one with a short?

4

Saturday, June 24th 2017, 6:53pm

First off, go to an electrical supply house, if you can't find the exact fuse. You never replace with a larger value, when you can't find an exact match. You go with a lower value, and protect the circuitry.

Outside of that, you got a shorted solenoid, and you have to replace it.
Yes, it was indeed a shorted solenoid. Replaced it (Toro 89‑0878 24 VAC part), worked ok for a few cycles, but got an issue after the last run. I replaced zone 3 solenoid. Everything works ok through zone 3, but when it switches to zone 4, zone 3 continuous to run (doesn't turn off). I looked inside the box with all the valves/solenoids, and found that solenoid of the zone I replaced is sipping the water out at the joint of solenoid with a valve. I had it tightened down pretty good, and there was no o-ring included with a replacement solenoid and there was no o-ring with the original one. But it almost feels like it's missing an o-ring, maybe that's why it's leaking? Would that explain the problem, since the water is sipping out from underneath of solenoid and it doesn't turn the zone off? Is there a place to get o-ring for this Toro solenoid? Any other suggestions, please?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,145

Location: Metro NYC

5

Monday, June 26th 2017, 7:44am

Your best solution when undertaking repairing your old system is to have an entire replacement valve, and not just parts, in your repair inventory. Yes, there needs to be an O-ring between the solenoid and the valve it connects to. You might find a match at a really good hardware store, some place where they have the assortment cases of O-rings you can buy individually.

To be fair, the O-ring never wears out. Someone has to lose it for it not to be in place on your valve.


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