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Arush71

New Member

1

Tuesday, September 30th 2014, 7:58pm

WELL PRESSURE VS CITY WATER

I just put in a well for my sprinkler system. No more expensive city water.
My problem is the sprinklers only spray about 3/4 of the distance of when it was on city water. I have upgraded from a
1 1/2 hp pump to a 2 hp and raised the pressure switch from 60 psi to 72 psi. This had little effect if any. My city water pressure is 80 PSI. I was told not to raise the pump pressure past 75.
I was told it could be water friction.
My system from the well consists of a 1" line from the pump for about 2 ft. then it reduces to a 3/4" line for about 125 ft. It then ties into the original 1"line from the city water valve to the sprinkler system. I can switch back and forth between well and city. There is definitely a difference.
Where am I going wrong?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,255

Location: Metro NYC

2

Tuesday, September 30th 2014, 8:21pm

Try a 1-1/2 inch connecting line. The 3/4-inch pipe does indeed subtract pressure by way of friction.

By the way, is this a deep well with a submersible pump?

Arush71

New Member

3

Tuesday, September 30th 2014, 9:14pm

It is 140ft deep. But it pumps into a 3,000 gal holding tank first. then the 2 HP pump pumps it from there.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,255

Location: Metro NYC

4

Wednesday, October 1st 2014, 7:07am

The sizing of your connecting pipe, or any long run of pipe, has to be done with friction losses in mind. It would be best to have flow numbers from the system as it ran from city water. That would make it easy to connect the dots with a pump running from the storage tank, which I will assume, unless told otherwise, is a surface pump (make and model number, please)

By the way, if it hasn't already been done, a ground water interconnection with a sprinkler system requires nothing less than an RPZ backflow preventer in the city water line, at an outdoor location, to isolate the house water from the now-defined-as-toxic sprinkler system water. Keeping an interconnection without the proper backflow can lead to contaminating the house water, and even the city water supply feeding the house. The legal ramifications of that possibility of toxic backflow are expensive far beyond the price of proper plumbing.

Arush71

New Member

5

Wednesday, October 1st 2014, 3:41pm

There is a backflow preventer. The pump is a Goulds HSC20 with a Century 2 HP motor.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,255

Location: Metro NYC

6

Wednesday, October 1st 2014, 9:17pm

Then you need to consult friction loss tables, along with your flow data, and establish the proper plumbing for the connecting line. Total pressure loss in the interconnect should only be one or two psi, in order for it not to be getting in the way of system performance.

As for your un-named backflow preventer, I will once again stress for the wider audience that any city water interconnect to ground water has to be done right. In fact, some localities flat-out prohibit the practice, with the laws squarely on their side, because a homeowner can have his Certificate of Occupancy revoked, and his house subject to being emptied of its occupants and the doors padlocked, until the offending plumbing is remedied and inspected, and the CO restored.

Arush71

New Member

7

Wednesday, October 1st 2014, 9:44pm

WOW! Looks like I'm loosing about 27 psi. I will tear it out and replace it with 1 1/2" that will give me a 1.1 psi loss.
Thanks so much for your help.

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