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TerryInClass

Unregistered

1

Saturday, August 23rd 2014, 7:13pm

How can I close some emitters in a dripline?

I have an existing installation using 1/2" dripline with factory-installed emitters every 18" or so. We have moved some landscaping around and no longer need all those emitters to be active, but want to take advantage of the installed line to install our own above-ground emitters.

Is there a recommended approach for "sealing" the emitters that we no longer need? I'd hate to have to cut out all the line segments that have emitters and replace with couplers. Could it be as simple as a drop of glue or epoxy in the emitter?

Thanks!

PS Sorry if this has been covered, I searched the forums but couldn't find anything.

Terryinclass

Unregistered

2

Sunday, August 24th 2014, 12:39am

Clarification

Just wanted to clarify that the factory-installed emitters can't be capped with a goof plug. The holes are just large enough for water to weep through, and way too small for a goof plug.

Central Irrigation

Supreme Member

Posts: 364

Location: Central Minnesota

3

Sunday, August 24th 2014, 7:59am

I've seen many failed attempts by homeowners who used duct tape, electrical tape, or the likes. Typically it results in having to cut out the unwanted section and replacing with blank tubing (drip line that doesn't have emitters). Can't say I've seen epoxy over the emitters.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,060

Location: Metro NYC

4

Sunday, August 24th 2014, 11:01am

Nothing will ever securely glue to that kind of tubing, so either let it drip anyway, or cut and patch the tubing with conventional fittings.

Terryinclass

Unregistered

5

Sunday, August 24th 2014, 2:20pm

Thank you both, I'll report back. I figure I have nothing to lose by trying a couple of different things. Consider it a field study. :)

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,060

Location: Metro NYC

6

Sunday, August 24th 2014, 3:39pm

Just keep in mind that this is like pushing a peanut up Main Street with your nose, given the low cost of materials it takes do the job in the customary fashion.

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