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whatsavalve2014

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1

Sunday, April 20th 2014, 5:05pm

Slow leak from master valve

Hi all, I am hoping someone can help me, please. I have just turned on my sprinklers for this year and found that this valve in my basement is leaking, very slowly.



If you look on the outlet side, the left, there's some grayness and that's where the leak is. It's coming from the seam between the top and the base, right underneath the solenoid. I've had this house about 5 years and its about 20 years old. This is Colorado so we just thawed out recently. As far as I know, it wasn't leaking last year.

I am a home-owner; I can do some jobs myself. What do you think makes sense here?

A - Open it up and try to replace parts myself.
B - Buy a new one.
C - Call in a pro; home owners who like dry basements shouldn't touch this part.

If the answer is B, any advice on getting the old one out would also be appreciated. I wish I could say what the brand and model are but the sticker is on the side facing the wall (of course).

Thanks for any advice.

mrfixit

Moderator

Posts: 1,461

Location: USA

2

Sunday, April 20th 2014, 6:09pm

Repairing that valve would be an easy task. It might simply need an O-ring. Maybe a new diaphragm. You might be able to take the solenoid off and tighten the screws underneath it.

With that said, I do have a lot of experience with this valve. They quite frequently crack on the bottom after about 10 years of use.
If it does the valve will leak 24 hours a day until someone spots it. Not leak but spew out water. Lots of water.
You could replace it with the Toro 252-06-04 [url]http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/Toro-Irrigation-Valve-Flow-Control-p/252-06-04.htm[/url]. Those don't crack on the bottom like the dual port.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,058

Location: Metro NYC

3

Monday, April 21st 2014, 8:11am

It would be far better to get that valve out of the basement entirely, and install a new one outside.

whatsavalve2014

Unregistered

4

Saturday, May 3rd 2014, 2:40pm

Quoted

With that said, I do have a lot of experience with this valve. They quite frequently crack on the bottom after about 10 years of use.


Yes, I think mine has cracked. I'll be calling in a plumber to replace it. From what I can see, even when I turn off the flow from the main valve (a manual turn kind) there's still water getting to this valve. I'll have them look at the whole setup.


It would be far better to get that valve out of the basement entirely, and install a new one outside.


Can you elaborate a bit more on that, please? Why is it bad to have this valve in the basement? This is CO so it freezes outside in the Winter, if that matters any. I will talk to my plumber about this idea as well.

Thanks y'all.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,058

Location: Metro NYC

5

Sunday, May 4th 2014, 7:45pm

Unless that valve is located in a utility room with a floor drain, it doesn't belong indoors.

Also, seeing this sort of thing is a very strong suggestion that the system is entirely lacking in backflow protection, as required by plumbing codes.

whatsavalve2014

Unregistered

6

Monday, May 5th 2014, 5:03pm

Got it. There is no floor drain, so this makes sense. My plumber is here now and he agreed with this so I should be all set soon.

Thanks very much for the advice.

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