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NABRIL

Active Member

1

Tuesday, April 24th 2012, 9:04pm

Miami sprinkler system using well water...help

I recently had installed a sprinkler system that gets its water from a well 20 feet down known as the Miami Aquifer. My sprinkler heads are constantly getting clogged with silt and sand, and thus dont spray much (or anything at all). I clean them out, but the silt returns. I mentioned it to the installer, and he offered a service that cleans the lines out with some special device = $100.

The pump has a hose fitting on top which allows me to run water as long as I want, in essence, cleaning things out. I realize that doesnt clear the pvc lines underground, but it cleans the uptake tube that comes up 20 feet.

Any ideas on preventing the silt build up? Was he just looking for a quick $100 and blowing smoke up my a$$? Do I have a way to clean out the lines (removing the heads and letting water flow for a few minutes)?

Thanks

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,883

Location: Metro NYC

2

Tuesday, April 24th 2012, 11:42pm

Get a strainer installed in the supply - keep the crud out of the system

3

Wednesday, April 25th 2012, 10:45am

Afraid Wet-Boots is right.
You are going to have to stop the silt/sand.
There are some heads that are more tolerant of 'dirty' water but you system sounds like more than they can handle.

Maxi-paws are pretty crud resistant, if they will work for you.

NABRIL

Active Member

4

Wednesday, April 25th 2012, 8:41pm

Get a strainer installed in the supply - keep the crud out of the system


thanks wet boots. I know the tube coming up has a metal strainer on it, but obviously the sand gets through its holes. Now that everything is sealed and glued, should I replace that metal strainer with something with smaller holes and that is thinner? And I have to break pvc to get to it, probably.



More importantly, how do I clean out the existing sand in the pvc pipes? Remove one head at a time from my supply lines and let water flow out for a few minutes?

Central Irrigation

Supreme Member

Posts: 306

Location: Central Minnesota

5

Friday, April 27th 2012, 6:05pm

A filter after the pump is all that's necessary. Some like this....click here

Pulling off an end head of each zone would work.

If you do add a filter, I would recommend installing a Pressure Relief Valve on the pump. It should have one either way.

NABRIL

Active Member

6

Saturday, April 28th 2012, 6:51pm

A filter after the pump is all that's necessary. Some like this....click here

Pulling off an end head of each zone would work.

If you do add a filter, I would recommend installing a Pressure Relief Valve on the pump. It should have one either way.

thank you Minnesota. I am trying to picture and look where that filter goes, but I dont see it. It is T-shaped, so I assume it needs an inlet and an outlet. Would this filter go on the 2 inch tube coming out of my pump? That tube has a ball valve so I can close the flow and send it to the hose attachment bib. Would it go after that red ball valve?

Apparently I need to know my gpm flow rate to determine the mesh's micron number, no?

Central Irrigation

Supreme Member

Posts: 306

Location: Central Minnesota

7

Sunday, April 29th 2012, 8:46am

The output side of the pump should go like this....Pump...Spigot....Pressure Relief Valve....Filter....Ball Valve.....System
I like having the filter before the ball valve so I can close the valve, clean the filter, and not have all the water drain out of the mainline.
The size of the filter is generally dictated by the size of mainline. I.E., a 2" mainline would use a 2" filter. However, depending on the amt. of silt coming from your well, a larger filter would buy more time between cleanings. A few of our installed shallow well systems include a "Filter Manifold" comprised of 3- 1 1/2" filters, due to the amt. of silt the well produces.
Micron size is determined by the size of particles coming out of the well. On average, a 100 mesh screen is most suited to eliminate the size particles that cause problems for sprinkler valves and heads.
If you are serious about installing this filter, please take the time to install a Relief Valve. Cheap insurance against a burnt out pump. Especially with Miami Heat!

NABRIL

Active Member

8

Sunday, April 29th 2012, 6:58pm

Central
Thanks for your continued help. I attach a pic so I can understand this better. Based on what you see, would you say the filter could go after my ball valve? I can shut the water there with easy access to the filter. I am not sure if I have a pressure relief valve. Can you elaborate a little more as to why our miami heat causes me to need the relief valve? I am just trying to learn, that is all.
The output side of the pump should go like this....Pump...Spigot....Pressure Relief Valve....Filter....Ball Valve.....System
I like having the filter before the ball valve so I can close the valve, clean the filter, and not have all the water drain out of the mainline.
The size of the filter is generally dictated by the size of mainline. I.E., a 2" mainline would use a 2" filter. However, depending on the amt. of silt coming from your well, a larger filter would buy more time between cleanings. A few of our installed shallow well systems include a "Filter Manifold" comprised of 3- 1 1/2" filters, due to the amt. of silt the well produces.
Micron size is determined by the size of particles coming out of the well. On average, a 100 mesh screen is most suited to eliminate the size particles that cause problems for sprinkler valves and heads.
If you are serious about installing this filter, please take the time to install a Relief Valve. Cheap insurance against a burnt out pump. Especially with Miami Heat!

Central Irrigation

Supreme Member

Posts: 306

Location: Central Minnesota

9

Sunday, April 29th 2012, 8:27pm

Sorry, but for some reason the photos aren't showing on my computer.
The filter can be placed after the shut off, that's fine. I like it before the shut off so the mainline water doesn't empty into my lap when I go to clean the filter.
A pressure relief valve is designed to release water at a preset pressure level should a High pressure situation ever occur, i.e. a valve fails to open while the pump continues to run. If the pump continues to run while not being able to discharge water, it will overheat and damage itself. A clogged filter, which will happen, will cause a high pressure situation and the pump will work harder and hotter than normal, unless it is able to discharge it's excess water/pressure, which is why we install Pressure Relief Valves. I should note, a pressure tank and pressure switch works as well. Not knowing if your pump has either, the pressure relief valve is the cheaper of the two options.
The heat of a Miami summer day is probably 20 degrees closer to a pumps failure point than one in Minnesota.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Central Irrigation" (Apr 29th 2012, 8:45pm)


NABRIL

Active Member

10

Tuesday, May 1st 2012, 8:24pm

Central I, thanks again.

I emailed you from here, and I dont know if you got my message. I want to install this thing.

1) The pipe out of my pump is 1.5 pvc (2" outer diameter). Would I get the 1.5 or 2" filter?

2) I've noticed these filters are 15 inches or longer. I only have 14 inches from pipe to floor. Can I install it at an angle?

3) Can you kindly post a link to a pressure relief valve so I can see one?



thanks

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