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chrisl26

New Member

1

Sunday, March 18th 2012, 4:41am

finally taking the step!!!

i am finally having sprinklers installed at my home. no more 5:00 wake ups to setup the agricultural sprinklers in the front yard. i am having a company come in and install the pipe and heads to my boxes, from there i am doing the rest. he is running 1 main and i am going to use 1 inch manifold with a 1 inch BVP. my question is, i have a 3/4 water supply that i am going to upsize to 1 inch to feed the BVP. Where should i change over to 1 inch? should i do it dorectly off the T from the main or should i run across the basement in 3/4 and change over to 1 right before the BVP. the total distance of the run will be a little under 30 feet. cant wait to hear back from you guys!!!

wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

2

Sunday, March 18th 2012, 7:26am

Connect the 1" as close to the water meter as possible. Assuming the sprinkler pro said that 1" was needed.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,071

Location: Metro NYC

3

Sunday, March 18th 2012, 8:13am

Pros who cut in a connection to 3/4-inch copper near the meter use a tee with a one-inch outlet to the sprinkler system. Don't cheap out here, and yes, we know what one-inch type-L copper costs.

chrisl26

New Member

4

Sunday, March 18th 2012, 3:41pm

would i be able to get this online? i live in northern ct right near a FW webb so would they have it? i would rather order it if i could because i am out of the country right now and would like to have it when i get home

grey

Advanced Member

Posts: 90

Location: Eastern WA

5

Sunday, March 18th 2012, 4:16pm

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "grey" (Mar 18th 2012, 4:27pm)


Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,071

Location: Metro NYC

6

Sunday, March 18th 2012, 4:16pm

take your time and buy the copper at a real plumbing supply, if you want a minimum of fuss - the key item will be the 3/4 x 3/4 x 1 "bullhead" copper tee, which the home centers may not carry

If you do want to cheap out on material, I would recommend using CPVC plastic pipe and fittings, as it will definitely be strong enough, and it doesn't present the "instant inspection failure" that the ordinary white PVC pipe and fittings will, when used indoors.

chrisl26

New Member

7

Sunday, March 18th 2012, 5:48pm

i am definetly going to be using copper. Would it be beneficial to me to put a 3 piece union directly below my BVP for servicing if i have to

wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

8

Monday, March 19th 2012, 7:37am

You need a way to blow out your lines in the Fall. A tee with a threaded end in which you insert a threaded plug - or something compatable. Not sure where you would put it, wait for the pros to respond. Wait a second - are you talking about a PVB? - pressure vacuum breaker? If so, they go outside and below it you can install the tee I was referring to. Might be a better way to do it, but that's what I did. Also, consider a PVB with built in unions so you can take it inside in the winter.

Wetboots? How about pex with bite fittings for the inside work? Pex is cheaper than copper and easy to install, but the bites are expensive.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "wsommariva" (Mar 19th 2012, 7:44am)


Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,071

Location: Metro NYC

9

Monday, March 19th 2012, 8:50am

Nothing is wrong with PEX, but it can't handle the water pressure that sch 40 CPVC can, so it isn't as good of a sight-unseen recommendation. Also, you need special tools to assemble PEX. CPVC goes together with the same kind of cements we use outdoors on ordinary PVC.

The distinction of using CPVC for indoor work, as opposed to the less expensive PVC, comes from codes that no longer allow the indoor use of PVC for potable cold-water use.

wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

10

Monday, March 19th 2012, 9:15am

I've used pex only with the gatorbites since I don't want to do crimping.

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