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wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

1

Saturday, April 9th 2011, 6:38am

Toro 53300 PVB TROUBLE

Hi everyone.

Just completed my irrigation install, works great. But I have a major concern with my PVB. During install testing water would gush out of the PVB. I learned that it's pressure controlled, now I know.

After install was complete I shut off the water supply and drained it due to cold weather. Yesterday I turned the water on and turned the system on. No problems with zone 1 and zone 2. But when zone three started, water started to gush out of the PVB! Since I was home I turned it off. This morning all zones ran fine with no PVB problems.

Needless to say, I feel very uncomfortable going to work with the chance that I could come home and have a pond in my yard. I do have drains installed in each zone line.

Is there a different backflow device that ensures peace of mind? Any thoughts?

Thanks

wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

2

Saturday, April 9th 2011, 7:18am

Seems that a double check valve might be what I'm looking for. WIll this unit have similar problems as the PVB?

Mitchgo

Supreme Member

Posts: 502

Location: Seattle

3

Saturday, April 9th 2011, 11:44am

It takes water pressure to create the seal on the pvb.. Zone 3 didn't have much water in the zone intially so when the valve opened up, the demand was so great at first that the pvb lost it's seal. After the zone pressurizes the pvb will re-seal..

The valve is doing it's job.

wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

4

Saturday, April 9th 2011, 10:07pm

Thanks for the reply. I use auto drain valves on all three zones. Maybe that's a cause? I also read here that someone had a flood problem when the township was working on the water in his neighborhood.

So, I went ahead and bought a double check valve - around $95 shipped. I can install inside the house and that's a good thing. And I can sleep better.

Thanks again.

hi.todd

Supreme Member

Posts: 417

Location: Houston, Texas

5

Sunday, April 10th 2011, 1:29pm

I don't want to be a buzz kill! If you went from a PVB to a Double Check, You went from a high hazard backflow prevention device to a low hazard backflow device.

It may not be the backflow preventor at all that is your problem.

It could be bad valves or diaphragms that are preventing the valve from opening all the way. Most likely if the problem occurs on the same 1 or 2 valves. You have to ask yourself why do the other valves work.

Back to the Buzz kill. Double check valves are not recognized by many cities and water purveyor as an approved Backflow preventor because they are low hazard.

Check with your local codes, call the permit office or ask a sprinkler company. :( ;) :( ;) :( ;) :?:
:thumbup: :thumbsup:

hi.todd

Supreme Member

Posts: 417

Location: Houston, Texas

6

Sunday, April 10th 2011, 1:34pm

Also as a side note.
Toro is not known for being a major player in the world of backflow. You may want to try a febco, watts, wilkins, conbraco made in the U.S.A.

You may need to get the backflow tested upon installation and annually there after. If you install a double check and It is not an approved backflow device, you may not get hit with the pain now, but when you ever try to sell your house it will not be up to code. Most inspectors will get this.

:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
:thumbup: :thumbsup:

Mitchgo

Supreme Member

Posts: 502

Location: Seattle

7

Sunday, April 10th 2011, 1:49pm

Back to the Buzz kill. Double check valves are not recognized by many cities and water purveyor as an approved Backflow preventor because they are low hazard.
Todd,
I want to re-inform you some.

In manyarea's, Double Checks are allowed as a proper back flow device for an irrigation system, because in many area's, Irrigation is considered Low hazard .. In Fact.. In ALL regions in the country in the department of health codes, NO WHERE does it say irrigation is rated for high hazard ONLY. There are a couple that do say, irrigation SHOULD BE high hazard and double checks SHOULD not be used because they are rated for low hazard. This is not saying you can't use them though

However this up to your local water purveyor on what they choose to enforce.. So if they say RP's are the only way to go then so be it. IF they allow double checks as a proper back flow device for irrigation, then they can use them.

Yes call your water district up and ask what proper back flow devices can be installed.

Todd, Give me one example/ good reason of why irrigation should be considered a high risk application of cross connection. Just about any cross connection from a sprinkler system would be so diluted by the time it came back from the source

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Mitchgo" (Apr 10th 2011, 2:12pm)


Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,081

Location: Metro NYC

8

Sunday, April 10th 2011, 3:31pm

Try to maintain some consistency on backflow advice. If someone does not give out their location. I believe it is not my part to assume they are in a location that allows anything other than toxic-rated backflow devices for irrigation. On this basis, the OP is mistaken when he goes out and buys a DCVA. His present task is to see that the zone valves are in good working order. There is no question but that completely empty zone pipes increases chances of low zone pressures at opening.

wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

9

Sunday, April 10th 2011, 4:09pm

Op here. Why am I wrong for getting a dcva? From what I've read, it works. My town seems to require "a" backflow preventer device. EDIT: my town allows anti siphon valves, double check valves, PBV and one other type that I can't remember. Secondly that PBV, from what I've read can open up and cause floods. Why take that chance?

Not that it matters now, but noone answered my comment about the auto drain plugs that I have installed and if that can cause a PBV to gush water.

BTW, my system works great.

I bought a Febco DCV

Anyone want a free slightly used Toro PBV?

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "wsommariva" (Apr 10th 2011, 4:22pm)


Mitchgo

Supreme Member

Posts: 502

Location: Seattle

10

Sunday, April 10th 2011, 6:12pm

Where do you live?

Auto-drains are a horrible water waster.. That is most likely the reason why the PVB was leaking for a bit before it pressurized..

If your in a cold climate area, take those auto drains out and have your system winterized during the winter months

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