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dwinmac

New Member

Posts: 7

Location: Clay, NY

1

Saturday, September 4th 2010, 11:01am

How to Test Backflow device

I have a 30 year old Rain Bird sprinkler system which was installed by the contractor when the house was built. The house was a model home for 4 years or so. I haven't used the sprinkler system for 20 years or so. I decided to get it working this summer. I've replaced valves, some of the pipes and several sprinkler heads.

It has a Watts Anti-Siphon Vacuum Breaker No. 288A. Is there any way to verify that the device is indeed preventing backflow into the house plumbing?

hi.todd

Supreme Member

Posts: 412

Location: Houston, Texas

2

Saturday, September 4th 2010, 11:43am

You will probably have to pay a local irrigation company that provides that service. Not all of them do. Plumbing companies also, but again not all of them do provide that service. Irrigation companies may be a little cheaper than plumbers.
There is a license involved for this service. :thumbup: :thumbsup: 8o
:thumbup: :thumbsup:

Fireguy97

Advanced Member

Posts: 77

Location: Kamloops, In Beautiful British Columbia

3

Sunday, September 5th 2010, 3:24am

RE: How to Test Backflow device

It has a Watts Anti-Siphon Vacuum Breaker No. 288A. Is there any way to verify that the device is indeed preventing backflow into the house plumbing?

This is one of your classic good news - bad news situations.

The good news is that this type of valve is not a testable device, so you won't have to pay to get it tested. The bad news is that this valve is illegal connected to an irrigation system. This type of backflow device is only acceptable in a plumbing situation that does not have a valve after it. An irrigation valve counts as a valve, and an illegal install situation. If this atmospheric vacuum breaker (AVB) is installed on the pipe to your irrigation system, I can pretty much guarantee that it's not working, and has failed years ago.

Call your Municipality or your Water District to find out exactly what your backflow prevention requirements are. It will probably be a pressure vacuum breaker (PVB) or a double check valve assembly (DCVA). Most water districts in the USA require a PVB as a minimum requirement. Either of these devices will have to be tested upon installation, if it is moved to a new location, after any repairs, and at least annually.

Mick
Irrigation Contractor

Certified Backflow Assembly Tester

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