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Frankpc

Active Member

Posts: 40

Location: Kansas

1

Saturday, July 4th 2009, 1:53pm

Questions regarding design of new system

Hello and Happy Forth of July! I've read countless threads on this Forum and believe I have a very basic understanding of what I need. I live in the Kansas City area (it can get below 0 degrees F.) and my home is on a lot approximately 70' x 140'. I plan to have 3 or 4 zones in the front yard and 4 or 5 zones in the back.

So far, I've chosen the following Hunter supplies because, it seems they are recommended more on this board than any other brand:

ICC-800-PL timer with rainclik sensor,

8 ea. HPV-101 valves,

16 ea PGB-ADJ 4" rotors,

25 ea Institutional 04 sprays.

After the RPZ, I plan to bury a 1" polyethylene main about 12" deep (well above frost line). Then will use 3/4" polyethylene laterals. I do plan to use line drains on the laterals and main at the low spots. If anyone has advice regarding these selections, I would certainly appreciate your providing it.

Questions I have that I couldn't seem to find answers to include the following:

Should I include a master manual and an electric valve immediately following the RPZ? What is the purpose of the master electric valve?


I plan to build two valve manifolds using sch 40 pvc that would be glued/slipped into the valves. On one manifold, I plan to have 4 or 5 valves. I was planning to use 15"x21" rectangular valve boxes. I couldn't find any larger than that and am wondering whether 5 valves can be placed in the box even though it is rated for 4.

Thank you for your time, patience, and expertise,

Frank

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "Frankpc" (Jul 6th 2009, 11:18am)


Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,871

Location: Metro NYC

2

Sunday, July 5th 2009, 1:07pm

Don't waste time with drains. Winterize the system properly with an air compressor.

Frankpc

Active Member

Posts: 40

Location: Kansas

3

Sunday, July 5th 2009, 2:54pm

Thanks,

OK. I didn't have a lot of confidence in the idea of using the drain valves. It would seem that no matter where you placed them, you would miss a low spot in the pipe... or water in the heads and breakage would occur.

The problem with the weather in in Kansas is that it can shift from A/C to heater weather and vice versa in two days. So, I was thinking the drain valves might offer a small amout of protection, albeit not to be depended upon for the final system drain out / blow out.

Since I read your replies, I did a little more research and discovered QC valves. I am assuming that a plastic 3/4" valve would be sufficient. However, I found 1" and brass QC valves as well. While 98% of all other components of the system are plastic, I am wondering if this is a unique element in that it needs to accept a brass(?) male plug and perhaps could break if the plug is not inserted correctly.

Did you somewhat agree with the rest of my plan?

Thanks for your time,

Frank

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,871

Location: Metro NYC

4

Monday, July 6th 2009, 11:41am

Forget QC valves. A hose bib downstream of the RPZ will do for winterizing.
Are you working from a water meter in your basement?
An electric master valve is a must with a poly main line.

Frankpc

Active Member

Posts: 40

Location: Kansas

5

Monday, July 6th 2009, 12:12pm

Great idea! A hose bib accessible from the outside sounds more reliable and cheaper than a QC valve. Would the hose bib be underground in a box and somehow with its spout pointing upward to allow attachment of the compressor?

The water meter is underground in the front yard. I was wanting to keep the RPZ inside to make it easier to work on and to keep it from freezing. The main water line comes into a finished bathroom in a wall-mounted cabinet, where the RPZ will be with a hose attached as a drain and run the hose behind the wall to a nearby drain under a sink (I am hoping that isn't a terrible idea). The main line comes in and passes through the main shutoff valve, I plan to put a tee in just prior to the pressure regulator serving the house. Attach the RPZ there and exit the basement with 1" schedule 40. Then outside, just below grade, put in a master electric valve, then a manual valve (for the person performing the blowout), then the hose bib to serve as a blowout port.... Then a tee to serve two manifolds: one in front and one in back. Also planning to put the timer in the cabinet - another questionable idea.

Again, thanks for taking the time to help me with this.

Frank

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Frankpc" (Jul 6th 2009, 12:30pm)


Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,871

Location: Metro NYC

6

Tuesday, July 7th 2009, 7:14pm

You might want to make the system connection in the meter pit, if there's room.

Frankpc

Active Member

Posts: 40

Location: Kansas

7

Wednesday, July 8th 2009, 9:02pm

The meter is in a small box of its own. But, there is lots of room next to it for a second box. Have no idea how far down the water pipe is or whether it is copper or plastic. I assume it is 3/4" since a copper 3/4" line comes into basement.

Should I not be concerned with the RPZ freezing? That is why I was wanting to put it in the basement.

To put the RPZ outside, underground, near the water meter, I assume I would also place a manual cutoff valve, an electric master valve, a hose bib for blowout, and perhaps a regulator or pressure reducer to drop from the 117 psi to 75 psi in the box with it.

Does that sound right?

Thanks,

Frank

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,871

Location: Metro NYC

8

Thursday, July 9th 2009, 8:31am

Since your house is 60 feet from the street (from another thread) just stick with the indoor connection, and lose the RPZ in favor of a PVB located outdoors, unless there's something you haven't told us yet.

Frankpc

Active Member

Posts: 40

Location: Kansas

9

Thursday, July 9th 2009, 9:14am

Thanks WB,

Situation is... I have already purchased an RPZ. If I made the connection indoors, I would have to rent a hammer drill and bore a 1 1/2" hole through the foundation and dig down perhaps 3 or 4 feet to the hole outside under a bay window. So placing the RPZ outside eliminates that requirement. Also elminates the threat of water pouring out of the RPZ inside per your other message. At least with the RPZ, I can mount it below grade near the meter.

So, you've made it obvious to me that I need to mount the RPZ outdoors. In that case, I would plan to place it below grade near the meter. Since the pressure there is 117 psi, I think I need to place the following components in the following order beginning with the Tee:

manual shut-off valve - hose bib for blowout - pressure regulator or reducer (is there a difference?) to drop the pressure to 70 psi - electric shut off valve - RPZ - a second manual shut off valve (in case the RPZ is removed?) - then on to the manifolds. (I live in Kansas, so there is freezing conditions).

Does that sound anywhere near optimum?

Thank you,

Frank

HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

10

Thursday, July 9th 2009, 12:17pm

Do NOT!!! assume that you have 3/4" copper coming out of your meter just because that is what is coming into the basement. I've got a similar setup, but when I dug down to make a connection just after the water meter, it was 1" PVC from the meter to the house. Actually, that sort of setup makes perfect sense. PVC is cheaper than copper, but you can only use PVC in a mainline if it is burried. So for the buried water line from the meter to the house, they install cheap PVC. Then, just before going into the house, they convert to copper. On the plus side, if this is the setup, you will have even more capacity to be able to supply your home AND irrigaion if they have 1" PVC as it is larger than 3/4" copper.

If you are really worried about the RPZ freezing, you can always install it with a pair of unions and simply remove it from the outside pit and the end of the year.

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