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Friday, September 30th 2011, 10:03am

Author: HooKooDooKu

Backflow Preventer Placement help

Mick, Let's backup a minute here... I do appreciate you trying to set the record strait about any misleading information I might post. Since your "correction", I'm just trying to point out that people like me that are outside of the circle if irrigation professionals like yourself are going to be confused about the difference in these two devices. I'm also simply trying to point out to people like yourself that fully understand these devices and all the terminology that simply using the correct ...

Tuesday, September 27th 2011, 5:06pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Choosing RPZ brand?

In my years participating in these forums, it seems like I hear the most about Watts and Febco. I've at least heard of Wilkins, but not Conbraco. I'd say go with the one that is easiest to obtain. Me personally, I'd pick Watts just because that's what the big-box stores carry around here. You figure they are likely to be cheaper than any irrigation supply store, and quicker than mail order. If there is anything defective, it's a quick trip and no hassle to get a replacement.

Tuesday, September 27th 2011, 12:12am

Author: HooKooDooKu

How do you know when it's time to replace valves?

What sort of failure are you expecting from these valves? About the only thing I can thing of that could go wrong simple due to age is the handles rusting off or rusting over so much the valves can't be turned anymore and get stuck in an open or closed position. Worst case, you simply replace the whole unit.

Thursday, September 22nd 2011, 2:32pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

System keeps leaking and banging

You shouldn't need a pressure guage to determine if you have a Pressure Regulator in your house or not. You should be able to determine that visually. Most likely, you've got a meter at the curb and a single water line comming into the house somewhere underground (either in a basement or crawl space, unless this is a slab home). Once the water line enters the house, there is likely a Tee that feeds a hose bibb (the one I mentioned that comes before the regulator). The water main should then pass...

Wednesday, September 21st 2011, 5:35pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

System keeps leaking and banging

With a 120psi static pressure, you better already have a pressure regulator for the house plumbing. Typical household plumbing fixtures are only designed for around 50psi max. Most likely, there is a pressure regulator inside the house just after the water line enters. Usually, a house will have two outside hose bibbs. One bibb will be fed from the water line BEFORE the regulator, and the other will be fed from the water line AFTER the regulator. If the irrigation regulator is installed after th...

Wednesday, September 21st 2011, 11:00am

Author: HooKooDooKu

RE: System keeps leaking and banging

Quoted from "Simon" ...A final important piece of information is that we have very high water pressure. ~120 psi I believe... Did the irrigation company install a pressure regulator? If you have a static pressure at the meter greater than about 80psi, a regulator is just about required.

Monday, September 19th 2011, 10:38am

Author: HooKooDooKu

Strainers

Quoted from "Wet_Boots" I don't install strainers for RPZ's Can you Explain? As TeaMan points out, the liturature I've seen for Watts regarding their 009 RPZ has the following: We recommend a strainer be installed ahead of 009 series assemblies to protect the internal components from unnecessary fouling. Caution: Do not install with strainer when backflow preventer is used on seldom- used water lines which are called upon only during emergencies, such as fire sprinkler lines.

Wednesday, September 14th 2011, 5:46pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Backflow Preventer Placement help

Quoted from "Chuckface" Im in Virginia. Thanks for your help - I was planning on getting a reduced pressure valve for the backflow. Thats a good point about running to the spigot - i do need a larger pipe. Could you go from a 1/2 to 3/4 pipe? would that work? sorry for all the newb questions! Generally speaking, when you're dealing with irrigation, you want to avoid the use of any 1/2 pipe. One of the concerns about designing an irrigation system is that you don't want to violate the "speed lim...

Wednesday, September 14th 2011, 12:31pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

RE: RPZ devices

Quoted from "TeaMan" It appears that I need an RPZ device anyway. Glad I asked a few questions. I will have two supplies, one from a holding tank that collects rain water, and the other the municipal system. I need a device that will prevent backflow pressure as well as siphoning. Any recommendations on which to use. I don't want to break the bank, but want something familiar and easy to maintain. I saw three brands in Sprinkler Warehouse, Febco, Conbraco and Wilkins. It's a 1" main line coming...

Wednesday, September 14th 2011, 12:06pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Installing a Vacuum Breaker Backflow Prevention Device

Quoted from "Fireguy97" Quoted from "HooKooDooKu" ... Plumbing code stipulates that every device or assembly be supported with proper supports. This doesn't mean supported by the pipe itself. A 1" RPZ is a heavy assembly. Pipe 'feet' is a hack install, and a major problem waiting to happen. ... Mick Mick, If you're going to bother to chime in and knock my suggestion, do it properly!!! Don't just say my suggestion is wrong if you're not going to at least turn around and tell us what is right (i....

Wednesday, September 14th 2011, 11:54am

Author: HooKooDooKu

Backflow Preventer Placement help

Quoted from "Fireguy97" Quoted from "HooKooDooKu" The only industry standard backflow preventer you can install in a basement is a Duel Check Backflow assymbly (not to be confused with a simple double check valve, a DC Assy has the test cocks to "prove" each part of the device is working correctly). However, a DCA is considered the lowest level of protection, and some localities do not allow a DCA as a backflow preventer to an irrigation system. Sorry HooKoDoku, but you are the one that is a li...

Tuesday, September 13th 2011, 3:28pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Sprinkler head height

Most DIY instructions I've seen say to install the sprinkler heads just a little bit ABOVE ground height. Dirt builds up over time. Some of it is dust that settles out of the air, some of it is leaves, grass clippings, and other things that organically decay over time. The build up isn't fast. But if you mount the heads perfectly even with the ground, in several years from now, they will be below ground level. I would suggest a mounting height of 1/4" That will give years (decades?) for soil to ...

Tuesday, September 13th 2011, 12:07pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Watts RPZ devices

What Boots said... Even a manual control valve MUST be protected by some form of Backflow protection. After all, even if you are using a hose spigot (where when the water is off, backflow is impossible since the valve is absolutely shut), there is the possibility of an event that could cause backflow while the valve is open. In that case, the water company could start sucking water from your "testing" equipement back into the water supply. As for which RPZ, unless your local building athority sp...

Tuesday, September 13th 2011, 11:49am

Author: HooKooDooKu

Backflow Preventer Placement help

The 'simple' answer is that you need to check with your local building codes authority. Requirements for backflow prevention vary greatyly from locality to locality. Some will be so strict as to require an specific RPZ (down to the part number), while others are so loose that any industry accepted form of backflow prevention is allowed. The only industry standard backflow preventer you can install in a basement is a Duel Check Backflow assymbly (not to be confused with a simple double check valv...

Monday, September 12th 2011, 12:35pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Watts RPZ devices

The combination of a 60psi water supply and an RPZ should mean that you don't NEED pressure reducing anything. The RPZ itself is going to cause 10 to 15 psi pressure loss. Your valves will likely add another 3 to 5. When you tack on the pressure losses of the meter, the water pipes, and changes in evelvation, you're likely to have around 40 psi of pressure at the heads (a good number). The only place I would consider any sort of pressure control is if you want to get the 1800 series of Rainbird ...

Friday, September 9th 2011, 2:49pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Installing a Vacuum Breaker Backflow Prevention Device

To protect the PVC above ground, you can paint it to help reduce the effects of UV light. But even better would be to transition from PVC underground to copper above ground. Obviously the copper is impervious to UV light, and you're unliking the crack the copper should you ever hit it with a weed-eater. All it takes is a PVC male and copper female and make place these joints under ground. You could even build "feet" into the copper pipe to support the backflow device without the risk of it getti...

Tuesday, September 6th 2011, 11:14am

Author: HooKooDooKu

RE: Install Q's

Quoted from "grey" While installing my system I've run into some issues. 1. I redid teflon tape like 3 times already but can't seem to completely eliminate drip. I put 6-7 wraps of pink Teflon. The thickness of the pink tape likely only needs 3 to 5 wraps. 6 or 7 is good for the think white stuff. Another thing to check is your fittings themselves. Most are cast pieces, and the cast has two parts. I've seen several fittings where the two halves of the case didn't line up quite right and the thr...

Tuesday, September 6th 2011, 11:05am

Author: HooKooDooKu

Installing a Vacuum Breaker Backflow Prevention Device

IF you attempt to install a PVB indoors, there's several things that you have to consider. For one, I believe there are additional code requirements usually step in and require the drain to handle a certain level of flow. This flow requirement is usually what a worst case senario would be, which is basically the same as if a pipe had burst. Search the history of this web site and you can find instances where these PVB have not just leaked but forcefully spewed huge quanities of water. You got to...

Thursday, August 18th 2011, 1:37pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Designing New Install (Irrigation Meter and Pipe Construction Questions)

On the subject of the meter, it's not just the cost of installing. You have to get the details from YOUR water company. Most usually have a minimum charge per month for each meter. I know our city it's something like $8/month, and that pays for the 1st 5000 gallons of water. But if I only use 1000 gallons in a month, I'm still charged the $8 minimum. I know that in my case, when I ran the numbers, I found that the saving in sewer charges during the summer pretty much matched the cost of the mini...

Monday, July 11th 2011, 1:22pm

Author: HooKooDooKu

Placing heads near road/gas line

Laws vary from state to state. But as I understand it, marked utility locations do not mean you can not dig in that area. It just indicates where the lines are APPROXIMATELY located and that you must take precausions digging in that area. In our state, the "zone" is 18" of either size of the marked position. You are expected to NOT use mechanized digging "in the zone" unless you have been able to verify the exact location of the utility. You are allowed to hand dig (or use other "safe" methods o...