You are not logged in.

Reply

Dear visitor, welcome to SPRINKLER TALK FORUM - You Got Questions, We've Got Answers. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains how this page works. You must be registered before you can use all the page's features. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

Attention: The last reply to this post was 2646 days ago. The thread may already be out of date. Please consider creating a new thread.

Message information
Message
Settings
Automatically converts internet addresses into links by adding [url] and [/url] around them.
Smiley code in your message such as :) is automatically displayed as image.
You can use BBCode to format your message, if this option is enabled.
Security measure

Please enter the letters that are shown in the picture below (without spaces, and upper or lower case can be used).

The last 3 posts

Friday, August 3rd 2007, 2:14am

by bosakie

Thanks you for your input. I suspected that the main manifold would be over kill and probably more complicated as well as take up zone connections in the controller.

I realize that I should not mix heads. from each zone manifold I would run two lines one for the rotors and one for the low sprayer heads. I will put a shut off in front of each zone manifold. I already have one in the house before the back flow and I will put on after the back low.


Friday, August 3rd 2007, 2:06am

by HooKooDooKu

IMHO, anything added to a home irrigation system "so I can continue to keep sub zones running in the event I have to work on another" is overkill. Obviously any work that needs to be done beyond the valves can be isolated by temprarily disabling the zone valve. If you are talking about having multiple manifolds, the most I would think you would want is perhaps an isolation ball valve for each manifold so that you can shut down any single manifold without shutting down all of them.

You don't want to mix spray heads and rotors on the same circuit. The primary reason is that their watering rate (measured in inches of water per hour) are different (i.e. to get the right amount of water down, the sprays might need only 15 minutes, but the rotors an hour).

1" isn't that much more expensive than 3/4", but it gives you twice the flow potential and less pressure losses. So unless this is a really huge project, I'd go with the simplisity of 1" everywhere.

Thursday, August 2nd 2007, 9:14am

by bosakie

Lat and Main line question(s)

****o, I am currently designing my system and have a few questions.

1) I have a 1" main feed from my house and I want to hook a four valve system at this point after the back flow and the winterizing quick connector. I will have several zones that will also have a zone manifold. This is so I can continue to keep sub zones running in the event I have to work on another, Is this the best way to do this or is it over kill?

2) my lawn is framed by 10' wide bark with all types of flowers, trees, shrubs, etc. I don't want to put rotors her because they would be to close to the shrubs and block water. Is is ok to run two lines from a 4 zone manifold where one will supply the barked area with spray heads and one line to supply the lawn area with rotors? Both will run at different times. This is the same for the front, back and sides of the house.

3) I have 1" Maine with 17 GPM. I worked with the contractor to put in a pump that would handle the layout. (submersible) Should I use 3/4 lat lines or should I use 1" lat lines? If I use 3/4 lat lines should I come off of this with 1/2 funny pipe to the heads? or can I just use 1" all the way to the heads?

Thanks for your feedback

Bos