You are not logged in.

Reply

Dear visitor, welcome to SPRINKLER TALK FORUM - You Got Questions, We've Got Answers. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains how this page works. You must be registered before you can use all the page's features. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

Attention: The last reply to this post was 2926 days ago. The thread may already be out of date. Please consider creating a new thread.

Message information
Message
Settings
Automatically converts internet addresses into links by adding [url] and [/url] around them.
Smiley code in your message such as :) is automatically displayed as image.
You can use BBCode to format your message, if this option is enabled.
Security measure

Please enter the letters that are shown in the picture below (without spaces, and upper or lower case can be used).

The last 4 posts

Thursday, October 26th 2006, 8:52am

by kgr

Thanks for the responses. I am certain that my meter is 5/8 and my supply line comming off of the meter and into my basement is 3/4'. Flow test showed 12 gallons per min at hose bib and I have 50 psi (static). I guess what this boils down to is do I want to hear water running through my basement pipes at 3:00am while sleeping when the sprikler system would be running. Or dig down 3 feet and tie into my meter outside and avoid any in-house noise issues.

Friday, October 20th 2006, 1:28pm

by HooKooDooKu

99% in the place where you might live, but here in the South, water meters are at the street where kgr describes.

Here's the problems I see with your plan.

#1. 40' of 1" copper pipe in the basement is going to be expensive (you can't use PVC indoors).

#2. You're going to have to restrict your flow as Tom stated because of the 3/4" line you think you have from the meter to the basement.

If you insist on doing it this way, you might as well use the 3/4" copper in the basement since you're already going to have to design based on that supply size. And Since you're talking about running this 40' of pipe, it sounds like you've got a pressure regulator that you are trying to make sure you are tying into, so pressure drop through the 3/4" copper shouldn't be a big issue. Either that or you might as well save the 40' of copper and just tie into what ever 3/4" copper pipe is closes to your basement exit point.

#3. You'll get more noise in the house (you will hear the water running when ever the irrigation system is on, possibly a bad thing if you want to water at 5 in the morning before you wake up).

#4. When the irrigation system is "on", it will have a bigger impact on water availablility in the house. This could also exceed the capacity of the 3/4" line when irrigation is running and someone is taking a shower and the washing machine/dishwasher are all running at the same time.

When I finally just decided to bit the bullet and dig next to the meter, I was plesantly suprized to find that I've got a 1" PVC line running from the meter to the basement. The line swaps over to 3/4" copper somewhere just before entering the basement.

So by tying into the 1" line, I didn't have to restrict my design to the 3/4" copper tubing. Additionally, since a 1" can handle the equivilent of two 3/4" lines, I was able to design my irrigation system to be equal to maxing out a 3/4" supply line without effecting water to the house (i.e. the house is designed for a 3/4" supply line, the irrigation is designed for a 3/4" supply line, and the two are fed from a 1" supply line that can hanle both).

Friday, October 20th 2006, 10:24am

by Tom

I would say 99% of the systems I service are done the exact way you are describing. That is because 99% of the water meters are installed in the basement.

You have the best of both worlds. You can dig a large hole for your tap or tap the system out of your basement. By taping in right after your meter in the yard you save yourself the pressure loss associated with taping out of your basement. In most cases this is not an issue.

With a 5/8 meter and 3/4 copper service line I would design the zones for a maximum of 10 gpm. How is your pressure? 70 psi is the most I would use. If its higher you will also need to install a pressure reducing valve. By keeping your pressure in check (if its high) and designing your zones at 10gpm (thus keeping water velocity low) you will greatly reduce water hammer.


Tuesday, October 17th 2006, 12:24pm

by kgr

meter connection

I live in a area where the water meter (5/8) is in front yard about 35' from house and winters get below freezing. I know the correct way to tie in would be dig a hole next to meter and t off from their. I really don't want to dig a huge hole next to my meter. Would it be possible to t off after the 3/4" copper line entered my basement and bump it up to 1" travel about 40 feet across my basement to the side of my house, go through outside wall and connect bfp ect,ect. This would save alot of hassle with trenching in the main to the side of my house where i am going to istall the manifold. Am I asking for headackes (water noise) doing it this way or would it be ok. I would like a couple of opinions if possible.