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The last 10 posts

Thursday, April 14th 2005, 7:42pm

by Wet_Boots

No harm, no foul, but if you want useful advice, think before you post. There are no mind readers here. Sprinkler heads don't figure into pressure loss calculations. The pressure at the base of the sprinkler head is your calculation's end result. You will obtain no functional advantage with I20 heads at 30 psi, so stick with PGP's. When you get to the 30 psi mark, head performance suffers, with an uneven spread of water. This is a point where you could consider Rainbird heads, with their Rain Curtain nozzles. Less distance, possibly, but a better spread of water.

Thursday, April 14th 2005, 6:41pm

by TMC2004

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Wet_Boots</i>
<br />Go back and recalculate. If you have a flow loss of 44 psi, and a static supply pressure of 50 psi, that works out to 6 psi (six, count 'em, six) at the sprinkler heads. You might consider getting another hobby and leaving this job for a pro.
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

No, thats 44psi of total pressure loss, with the sprinkler heads included. The 6 psi you mentioned, means I have 6 more psi to give in total pressure loss, as long as i dont go over the 50 psi the system will work. The pressure loss without the sprinkler heads included in my calculations would only be 14 psi. Please no need to be rude, I come to learn just like everyone else.

Thursday, April 14th 2005, 6:26pm

by Wet_Boots

Go back and recalculate. If you have a flow loss of 44 psi, and a static supply pressure of 50 psi, that works out to 6 psi (six, count 'em, six) at the sprinkler heads. You might consider getting another hobby and leaving this job for a pro.

Thursday, April 14th 2005, 5:28pm

by TMC2004

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by RidgeRun05</i>
<br />I would go with the I-20 heads if you have the pressure, unless you are really concerned with budget. In my opinion they are more durable than the PGP heads. Good Luck
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">


why would the I -20's use anymore pressure than anyother rotor. rainbirds and other manufacters show that the rotors are rated for 30psi +. I guess I dont understand what you mean. So far ive calculated my pressure loss through my water meter, Back flow preventer, house and irrigation maninlines,control valves, sprinkler heads, and laterals. Ive come up with 44 psi of pressure loss. My static pressure from my hose bib runs 48 -52 psi. Will i have a problem running I-20's?

Sunday, April 10th 2005, 3:35pm

by Robbies

I would have to dissagree with ....., I use them in my system at 50psi and no leak and no problems

Sunday, April 10th 2005, 11:00am

by RidgeRun05

I would go with the I-20 heads if you have the pressure, unless you are really concerned with budget. In my opinion they are more durable than the PGP heads. Good Luck

Saturday, April 9th 2005, 6:22pm

by Matthew

I have a 1/2 acre filled with I-20 Stainless Steel heads,no problems. Also, great nozzle selection...

Saturday, March 19th 2005, 4:26pm

by Wet_Boots

Stainless steel versions of most popular gear-drive rotors are not vastly different from base models, springs and check valves aside. I believe a Hunter PGP uses the same gear-drive mechanism as the I-20, since the rotating top part can break off easily enough on either model.

Friday, March 18th 2005, 10:33pm

by sanzen96

DO NOT get the stainless steel version of the i-20 unless you have at least 80 psi. the heavier spring will reqiure more pressure to pop them up. low pressure will make them leak around the seal. ive been a proffesional for 14 years and the steel i-20's are big problems. you will be using that 5 year warranty. plus the i-20's dont all come with "check-o-matics". these are just screens with a rubber stopper on it. you can buy these cheap and install them on regular trustworthy pgp's with ease!!!! plus you should never adjust your sprinklers dry, always while they are spraying. i have pgp's in my own system and after the countless experiences installing i-20's at work almost everytime, i wouldnt even consider it. a big waste of money and time!!!!!!!!!!

Monday, January 10th 2005, 1:19pm

by GrazerZ

I'm going to put a plug in for the Rainbird 5000 rotors. I love them thats my first choice when installing a system. The I-20 are a good product and havn't had seen too may problems with them. But the rain curtain spray pattern on the 5000s is a work of art to me.