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The last 10 posts

Saturday, May 25th 2013, 8:13am

by electrifiedmale

Should I just get the torch and heat the poly?
If you don't already have a torch, I might suggest In lieu of one of those big torches with a big bottle of gas on it like the pros or a plumber might use, you might consider a little torch called a micro torch from Harbor Freight. 9$. You can't ruin the poly so easily with one of these but you do have to be careful no matter the case.

The little torch runs on butane. Go to the tobacco store and get one of those small containers of butane that's used to refill cigar lighters for 4$ to fill the micro torch with.

This thing is perfect for the DIYer that doesn't need a big torch. It has a fairly small flame that is adjustable and is easy to use. Just keep the flame moving all the time then give the fitting a go. This thing was great for installing my whole system and I didn't melt the pipe, not even once.

Saturday, May 25th 2013, 7:46am

by electrifiedmale

Connecting a four-valve manifold of barbed-outlet valves to four separate poly pipes can be a thing more easy to describe than it is to actually accomplish, since the pipes don't always line up neatly, and digging up all the pipes to get more wiggle room might be easier said than done.
haha. You got that right! Ive only built one sprinkler system - mine - and used poly. Built my manifold first, and getting those pipes on those barbs was a real B***h !! Only one of about a million lessons learned! If I ever do another, I would definitely consider a different approach.

Thursday, May 23rd 2013, 11:02pm

by Wet_Boots



Others seem to prefer glue and fitting manifolds vs. "special manifold fittings with built in unions." Why do you prefer the fittings + unions approach?
I prefer doing work that never has to be rebuilt. The people asking questions here possess a different skill set. Note the OP claims of having struggles.

The general idea is to get their systems operational. Connecting a four-valve manifold of barbed-outlet valves to four separate poly pipes can be a thing more easy to describe than it is to actually accomplish, since the pipes don't always line up neatly, and digging up all the pipes to get more wiggle room might be easier said than done.

Thursday, May 23rd 2013, 9:08pm

by camner

this is one reason why there are special manifold fittings made with built-in unions


Others seem to prefer glue and fitting manifolds vs. "special manifold fittings with built in unions." Why do you prefer the fittings + unions approach?

Thursday, May 2nd 2013, 1:43pm

by Scott76

I've done many valve replacements over the years as a sprinkler tech. I "usually" hook the PVC main pipe up first as it is basically inflexable. Dig down you poly lines about 1 and a half feet to allow for some flex in the pipe. VERY carefully apply heat to the poly pipe and then slide it over the barbed port on the valve. I would recommend using two oetiker clamps per valve fitting in an offset fasion. If you don't have the special oetiker crimp tool hose clamps work, but I'm not a huge fan of them.

Sunday, April 21st 2013, 11:39am

by Wet_Boots

Sight unseen, there's no way to know how best to proceed. Obviously, the union manifold fittings take the difficulty away, since they let you connect valves to poly pipes one at a time.

Sunday, April 21st 2013, 7:37am

by Weave

Ok thanks...I have some scrap I may practice with.
Which order would you typically do this install as a pro?

Saturday, April 20th 2013, 4:50pm

by Wet_Boots

Unless you apply heat properly, you either don't get the job done at all, or you melt the pipe and ruin it. Polyethylene is not copper.

Allow for these possibilities in your planning.

Saturday, April 20th 2013, 2:55pm

by Weave

Thanks so your saying that a pro would heat the poly?
I have a torch and am fairly handy and can sweat copper etc....for some reason my torch won't run unless almost uprightim going to borrow a buddies torch and try that.
I guess that's what I'm taking away from your reply?

Saturday, April 20th 2013, 2:46pm

by Wet_Boots

a pro has no fear of using a torch to heat poly - an amateur should allow for the likelihood of their melting some of the poly into uselessness

this is one reason why there are special manifold fittings made with built-in unions