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The last 10 posts

Monday, July 9th 2012, 9:06am

by GatorGuy

Consider:
Aquiline I50-532
Operating Range:
Pressure 25-50 PSI
GPM 2.60-5.00
When you exceed design pressures on nozzles you start getting misting and degradation of pattern.

Bigger problem: water hammer.
"I dont understand. The pipe is rated for 200 psi"
When systems turns on/off the pressure does not suddenly go away.
There will be shock waves in the pipe. These waves not only travel end to end but diametrically, stressing every inch.
And they will do it more than once. A pressure wave can easily travel back and forth through a closed system multiple times.
That's why it is not recommended to exceed 5 foot per second on water flow.
Your 80 psi could easily hit 160+ in a poorly designed system.
As central indicated, you will beat your pipes, fittings, etc. to death.

"If all the equipment and pipeing is designed for much higher psi which also give you more flo why not?
"
They are not designed for higher psi. They are designed with a maximum range they will handle. However, that does not mean they will work most effectively at their maximum range and, very important, you leave yourself very little room for error.

If you design for the max you will spend a lot of time and money repairing your system.

Sunday, July 8th 2012, 4:57am

by caymandave (Guest)

flo rate

I think you need to regulate the psi downward. My guess. My system runs at about 35psi and 8 gpm

here is the propblem. I designed this thing for high psi so the sprinkler heads would reach out. lower psi will shorten that distance considerably. If all the equipment and pipeing is designed for much higher psi which also give you more flo why not?

Saturday, July 7th 2012, 7:57pm

by Central Irrigation

I wouldn't worry about the pressure, almost all of today's sprinkler components will work fine at those pressures. What Gatorguy is trying to explain is how fast the water is moving through the pipes. Moving too much water through a 3/4" pipe can cause excessive wear and premature failure of just about every component of your sprinkler system. Higher operating pressure will only compound this problem. You can definitely run your system at these higher pressures, just make sure you're not exceeding the flow rate for the pipes you choose to use.

Saturday, July 7th 2012, 7:53pm

by mrfixit

I'm not sure what the big deal is. There's hundreds of systems in my area with 80lb's and higher. 100 lbs is common place here.
I've never even seen a sprinkler system with 35 lbs of pressure. Sounds like a nightmare to me.

Saturday, July 7th 2012, 6:21pm

by caymandave (Guest)

flo rate

I think you need to regulate the psi downward. My guess. My system runs at about 35psi and 8 gpm

here is the propblem. I designed this thing for high psi so the sprinkler heads would reach out. lower psi will shorten that distance considerably. If all the equipment and pipeing is designed for much higher psi which also give you more flo why not?

Saturday, July 7th 2012, 1:30pm

by wsommariva

I think you need to regulate the psi downward. My guess. My system runs at about 35psi and 8 gpm

Saturday, July 7th 2012, 10:50am

by caymandave (Guest)

flo rates

1. You can't effectively run at 80psi. Beyond many operational/design parameters.
2. 3/4" Sch 40 pvc can only push 8gpm and be within design parameters.
3. 3/4" Class 200 pvc can only push 10gpm...
4. Refer to design charts for info.
5. Note on the chart that areas above 5 feet per second are noted. You don't want to exceed 5fps.


I dont understand. The pipe is rated for 200 psi
Febco back flo rated at 150 psi
SWMS-4 was not rated and no instructions were included from Sprinkler Warehouse
Hunter valves supplied rated at 150 psi
Impact sporincleers Awualine 150-532 were not rated and instructions were included from Sprinkler Warehouse
So Where is the problem?

Monday, July 2nd 2012, 8:08am

by GatorGuy

1. You can't effectively run at 80psi. Beyond many operational/design parameters.
2. 3/4" Sch 40 pvc can only push 8gpm and be within design parameters.
3. 3/4" Class 200 pvc can only push 10gpm...
4. Refer to design charts for info.
5. Note on the chart that areas above 5 feet per second are noted. You don't want to exceed 5fps.

Sunday, July 1st 2012, 10:17am

by Wet_Boots

Not enough information

Sunday, July 1st 2012, 4:45am

by Caymandave (Guest)

Flo rates

I have a 3/4" supply line at 80 psi that will flo at least 17.5 gallons per minute. That translates to 1050 gallons per hour.
If I used sprinkler heads that consume 8.4 gallons per hour how many could I install on one zone. I plan on using 1" main trunk and feeders to each head.