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The last 10 posts

Monday, April 23rd 2012, 8:30am

by GatorGuy

RPZ is always the best way to go if you are adding chemicals to the system.

Sunday, April 22nd 2012, 3:08pm

by Wet_Boots

RE: RPZ installation & testing

................In looking at the R value factors for the insulating pouches, I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving the RPZ out in the cold even with such a pouch. If the unit is removed for winterizing each fall, should it be tested each spring?

The testing equipment appears to be very expensive. Is this something the average homeowner could do?
Testing an RPZ is entirely outside the reach of a homeowner, when it comes down to it, because there is a paper trail involved in the testing of safety devices like an RPZ. A homeowner's word counts for nothing at all. The word of a licensed tester of backflow preventers counts a whole lot more.

a PVB has a construction that admits air into the device, when the supply pressure drops below a certain point - this air opening is the primary protection the PVB gives you, and as long as the PVB is the highest part of the sprinkler system, the air opening and gravity is what keeps system water from getting back into the house plumbing

Sunday, April 22nd 2012, 2:45pm

by Wet_Boots

RE: RPZ installation & testing

I currently have a PVB backflow preventer, but I am looking to install a fertilizer injection tank so it seems I need to go the route of RPZ. I had one plumber install the PVB which worked well, but then I didn't winterize it and it ended up cracking. I had another plumber install the second one and I don't think they knew how to test it. Who would test a RPZ if I installed one? An irrigation company or a plumber?

In looking at the R value factors for the insulating pouches, I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving the RPZ out in the cold even with such a pouch. If the unit is removed for winterizing each fall, should it be tested each spring?

The testing equipment appears to be very expensive. Is this something the average homeowner could do?
Forget the RPZ at this point. You almost certainly do not have enough pressure to allow for an added RPZ to take away an additional 10 psi of system pressure.

Sunday, April 22nd 2012, 2:23pm

by whitty

RPZ installation & testing

I currently have a PVB backflow preventer, but I am looking to install a fertilizer injection tank so it seems I need to go the route of RPZ. I had one plumber install the PVB which worked well, but then I didn't winterize it and it ended up cracking. I had another plumber install the second one and I don't think they knew how to test it. Who would test a RPZ if I installed one? An irrigation company or a plumber?

In looking at the R value factors for the insulating pouches, I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving the RPZ out in the cold even with such a pouch. If the unit is removed for winterizing each fall, should it be tested each spring?

The testing equipment appears to be very expensive. Is this something the average homeowner could do?

Thursday, April 19th 2012, 11:18am

by Lunker (Guest)

By the time you go through the removal of an RPZ and covering up the union ends, you could have just as easily winterized it in place.
Its copper coming out of the house, Im not on PVC until it hits the lines under the lawn. The copper comes out of the house and makes a loop

The best example I can give is the attached link. Its looks exactly like this
http://www.ngcwater.com/winterize_rpz.htm


I was just looking to put some copper unions on then I can remove it each winter and store it in my basement. Figured its more fool proof than leaving it outside in the elements.

Also, I've gotten quotes to put this on from Plumbers from $550 -- $600. Its soldering joints right? I think I can handle that on my own. Understand the need to have it tested though.

Thursday, April 19th 2012, 10:46am

by Wet_Boots

By the time you go through the removal of an RPZ and covering up the union ends, you could have just as easily winterized it in place.

Wednesday, April 18th 2012, 1:25pm

by wsommariva

But, if you really want to remove it, I GUESS pvc unions would work. Check with a qualified plumber. I use pvc unions on my 3/4" PVB. On my 1" PVB, no unions, it's permanent.

Wednesday, April 18th 2012, 1:24pm

by wsommariva

I don't think you need to remove it in the winter. Just winterize per instructions. I know Febco PVBs are popular. I'd feel comfortable with Febco and Wilkins.

Wednesday, April 18th 2012, 10:39am

by Lunker (Guest)

Why do you want to remove it? Does your basement freeze?
Im putting it outside. I don't want it in my basement as I don't have a drain any where near where the water comes in from the house and the basement is finished.

I've heard if these fail you can have water everywhere

Tuesday, April 17th 2012, 5:50pm

by Wet_Boots

Thanks! any recommendation for a removable one?
No. None whatsoever. Removing an RPZ is something I would never do. I certainly won't store them myself, and I would not count on a homeowner to never misplace it on his own.