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The last 5 posts

Tuesday, June 28th 2011, 12:29pm

by wsommariva

My system was small. Still I needed to make a few adjustments after everything was in. So don't cover up the trenches until you're happy with the system.

Tuesday, June 28th 2011, 10:06am

by str8jkt

Thanks for the responses guys/gals. Its appreciated.



Going off the specs here - http://www.hunterindustries.com/products/mprotator/

I will be using MP1000 for all the rotator heads. I only need the 14' of spray in between heads, as the yard is approximately 31x32.

Here are the GPM requirements for the MP1000 that I will be using.

1x 360 degree - 0.75GPM
4x 180 degree - 0.37GPM each
4z 90 degree - 0.19 GPM each

Gives a total of 2.99 GPM. I stated around 3.5 GPM as I am considering putting a strip spray along the top left area as well (another 0.22 GPM added).



Thanks to both of you as for suggestions for the back bed as well. I was throwing around ideas of putting in a couple 90 degree 8' mp rotators and some strip rotators to cover it, but as with any kind of bed I was worried about "bushier" plants possibly blocking the spray on them. Will have to look further into drip I guess.

Tuesday, June 28th 2011, 9:20am

by wsommariva

Strip heads didn't work in my beds. I had them 18 inches off the ground. The water shot out and fell at 12 feet. Didn't water the area between the head and where the water fell at 12 feet. Toro brand. I switched to 4 inch pop up spray heads. Works well.

Don't know about that one zone for 9 heads. 11 gpm didived by 9 is about 1.2 gpm per head. Maybe I'm missing something.

Valves - get "good" ones. A head is easy to replace, valves not so easy. IMHO

PE is easier than pvc to install.

Tuesday, June 28th 2011, 9:17am

by HooKooDooKu

What exactly is your plan for the 9 MPRotators on one circuit? You say they will only use 3.5GPM, but the only way I see that possible is if you are using 9of the MP2000 Rotators with ALL of them set at only 90 degrees of arc.

For garden/flower beds, I personally like drip irrigation because it gives you many choices. There's drip emmitters, there are micro sprays, and once you've got the pipe run to the beds, you can always change things out. What I like to do is run PVC underground to the area I wand to irrigate, then while still underground, I transition to copper to come up out of the ground with a 90 degree bend right as the pipe comes up out of the ground. By ending the copper with a female fitting, I can completely tear out the drip irrigation all the way back to the copper if any problems come up.

In my case (but then I sort of over-do things), while I had the ground open for installing pipe, I ran three drip irrigation circuits to each flower bed. The circuits all terminated with a female fitting burried inside a valve box. The circuits I didn't want to use in that flower bed at this time I kept capped off. The others, I drill a hole in the side of the valve box and connect the circuit to copper pipe for the transition above ground. In the future, if I change the flower beds and want different water scheduling issues, I only have to go back to the circuits already run to the valve box to completely redo the watering schedule.

Monday, June 27th 2011, 2:14pm

by str8jkt

Suggestions for improvement on sprinkler setup for backyard?

I am planning on using MP Rotators for my backyard. Attached is a picture of what it will look like. I currently have 9 sprinklers mapped out in a fairly basic NW, N, NE, W, Central, East, SW, S, SE format. Using MP1000 with a 14' spread I am close to having sprinkler to sprinker coverage.

There is a strip of lawn along the very top left which I may add an MP Strip sprinkler to, but haven't decided if I will be laying sod there yet as it does not get a lot if any sun right , plus the swale directs drainage of any water through there as well.

I am unsure as to what to do about the two garden/flowerbed areas. There is a small one at the top left of the drawing as well as a larger area at the very south end. In the very SW corner is a shed. The "garden" cosists of a tomato plant and a bunch of herbs/peppers, primarily with the narrow part along the rest of the south part being 5 tree's with the potential of some annuals planted around them to fill in until the trees (columnar aspens) fill out and grow a little more. The area is mulched.

The other small bed is at the northwest corner and consists of some fruit bushes (raspberry, blueberry, etc..).

Also any suggestions for improvement would be greatly appreciated. The pressure is 50PSI with 11 GPM. Is there any issue with putting 9 of the MP Rotator's on a single zone when the GPM for these will only be around 3.5?

Does anyone have any suggestions about how to water these garden areas? Would it be best to go with drip or should i put in a couple mp's for the south section?


Sorry about all the questions, but if anyone would be so kind as to answer what they can every bit of help would be appreciated. I have been reviewing irrigationtutorials.com as well as this site and pretty much every major sprinkler manufacturer. Its information overload sometimes and helps to get a third party perspective.