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The last 5 posts

Friday, June 24th 2011, 12:29pm

by MongoClark

(took awhile to find the old thread I detailed the method on)

To make an extreme example, imagine all the wires are the same color. You would have to mark the ends of every wire currently connected to the controller's outputs with a numbered tag. Then you would take resistance measurements from each wire to every other wire, one at a time, and write down the measured resistance value on a grid chart. That can be a lot of measurements (45 measurements for 10 wires) - but it will pinpoint which of the unknown wires is the common. Once you are certain of the common, you can work out the rest.
Thanks Wet Boots I'll give it a shot.

Friday, June 24th 2011, 12:25pm

by Wet_Boots

(took awhile to find the old thread I detailed the method on)

To make an extreme example, imagine all the wires are the same color. You would have to mark the ends of every wire currently connected to the controller's outputs with a numbered tag. Then you would take resistance measurements from each wire to every other wire, one at a time, and write down the measured resistance value on a grid chart. That can be a lot of measurements (45 measurements for 10 wires) - but it will pinpoint which of the unknown wires is the common. Once you are certain of the common, you can work out the rest.

Friday, June 24th 2011, 10:23am

by MongoClark

sounds like it's time you identified and marked the wires, and to do so, you need a multimeter to measure resistance
Ya think you could go more into detail instead of saying measure resistance?? A little more insight might help me out!

Friday, June 24th 2011, 8:45am

by Wet_Boots

sounds like it's time you identified and marked the wires, and to do so, you need a multimeter to measure resistance

Friday, June 24th 2011, 6:49am

by MongoClark

Solenoid wiring help

I have an old Toro system installed back in 1997 with a Toro GreenKeeper Control Box and have 6 zones. I had to change a solenoid the other day and if are looking down where the control valve with the solenoids attached I removed the middle solenoid which also meant I had to remove wires on the left solenoid as well and then had to order the solenoid and diaphram. But did I mark the wires so when the solenoid came in I could put it together? HECK NO!! Now I do know which wire goes to what. like i said the vales if you look down there are three the right one is o.k and the middle and left are my problem child. I'm stupid when it comes to electrical so please talk in layman terms.