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The last 10 posts

Monday, August 29th 2011, 7:57am

by Wet_Boots

AFAIK, already at the top of the range. Evenness of precipitation
across the installation may also be a factor. Plus it makes sense
to add in the extra zones, now that there's more water than the
designer thought would be available.
If you have way more supply from the well than you planned for, then you can plumb in a "Cycle-Stop Valve" into the well setup. The simplest of these will cap the outlet pressure at 60 psi maximum and allows the pump to run steady without cycling.

Sunday, August 28th 2011, 11:35pm

by PerryNZ

You're Right - T'was Only An Example

The 1 hour figure was for illustrative purposes only.
Zone 7 needs to run for whatever duration is the
aggregate total time of all the other zones.

Dan 2001 micro sprinklers @ 70 lph ea , covering long
strips of garden, under big and thirsty trees. By the
time a few others are reckoned, about 1000 lph for
zone 7, give or take a bit. Those micro sprinklers
seem quite tolerant of pressure fluctuations, too.

It's looking like running another controller might be
the most workable solution. The installer is making
a return visit, in a couple of days.

Sunday, August 28th 2011, 10:01pm

by Mitchgo

What application is zone 7 and why do all the zones need 1 hour run time? It's pretty rare to actually need that much run time IMO

Sunday, August 28th 2011, 9:18pm

by PerryNZ

AFAIK, already at the top of the range. Evenness of precipitation
across the installation may also be a factor. Plus it makes sense
to add in the extra zones, now that there's more water than the
designer thought would be available.

Sunday, August 28th 2011, 6:58pm

by Wet_Boots

What prevents you from changing the nozzles in the sprinkler heads, to match zone flow to the water supply?

Sunday, August 28th 2011, 5:08pm

by PerryNZ

Oh, Well . . .

I had a system put in by an installer. But the pump delivers more than he anticipated!
I think he 'allowed' for more losses and a bigger margin-for-error than proved necessary.
That's brought on some interesting consequences.

So I have a question about controllers.

The installed system uses a Hunter geared sprinklers and a Pro-C controller. As far as
I can tell, the controller can't switch more than one station, unless wired in common.
To 'make use' of the surplus water capacity, (to keep the pump from cycling on & off)
I want to integrate other existing zones (stations?) into the newly-installed system.

But that requires running several zones/stations for uncommon times. I.e. Run zone 7
for 6 hours continuously, while running the other six zones concurrently with zone
7, but one at a time.

E.g. zone 1 plus zone 7 for one hour, zone 2 plus zone 7 for the next hour, zone 3 plus
zone 7 for the next hour, and so on. (That's needed to compensate for the lower pre-
cipitation rates of the micro sprinklers in the existing zones to be added.)

Am I right in assessing the Pro-C as unable to do that? If so, what alternative controller
would do what's required? As the system expands, I don't foresee more than 12 zones,
in total.

Or is adding another controller the best way to go?

Thursday, June 2nd 2011, 5:01pm

by PerryNZ

It was the sprinkler head performance that my question
was aimed at. I'm familiar with the supply pressure
options of the existing system. The present water use
devices are optimum at 2 bar. Or close: a little higher
is better than a little lower, generally. Significantly
higher pressures give more misting and 'atomization'
with concomitant loss to wind drift - impact sprinklers
being the worst affected. The same supply is used
for five household's domestic supply, so much below
two bars can be a dilemma for showers, ceramic
mixer tapware and such.

Thursday, June 2nd 2011, 7:36am

by Wet_Boots

Why not do some testing of your supply, and not have to guess about your design?

Thursday, June 2nd 2011, 1:10am

by PerryNZ

You just need an adequate amount of water pressure and supply. With out it, they don't work well at all.
OK - thanks. Their tolerance for pressure/flow drop
is poor. In your experience, presuming good volume/
flow, what's optimum? 2 or 3 bar? (Or higher?)

Thursday, June 2nd 2011, 12:24am

by Mitchgo

You just need an adequate amount of water pressure and supply. With out it, they don't work well at all