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The last 7 posts

Monday, September 14th 2009, 3:47pm

by debo

EVERYTHING isn't required to be 18" down. As an example, phone lines and cable tv lines (at least the ones leading to your house) are never burried that deep. 6 inches is a maybe. But then again, these are not lines that risk life and limb should they be hit.

And just because those that came before you is no reason to skip following code.

For one, it might not be an utter lack of respect for the code, but someone making a mistake, basically two contractors not properly coordinating. For example, I used to work for the phone company and would hear stories where phone lines would get laid in a new developent, but then a landscape contractor would come through afterwards and dig up the usually shallow phone cables.

I can see similar things happening when it comes to installing other utilities. The utility comes in and installs utilities according to code. But at the time, landscaping was only rough. Final landscaping would then alter the depths of these utilities. But then, a part of trying to keep everyone save is the "Call before you dig" program is so that you'll know where to be careful.

Of course, I'll admit that the other side of the coin is that everyone is trying to get things done on the cheap and things do not get "properly" installed because of shotty work. But from what I've seen of building codes, they somewhat take that sort of thing into account. As an example, a part of the reason most utuilities are supposed to be 18" deep is so that a combination of some shotty installs and later landscaping might at least keep these utilities at a relatively safe depth.


My point was that not even City workers follow it. When I am told Natural gas is to be MIN 18 inches and I watch them install it less shows you that well.......Even call city hall and get "it is to be xx deep but might not be"...Codes are great but have yet to see over 50% follow them.



I have even found untilites in locations not even to be there.

Monday, September 14th 2009, 1:17am

by HooKooDooKu

EVERYTHING isn't required to be 18" down. As an example, phone lines and cable tv lines (at least the ones leading to your house) are never burried that deep. 6 inches is a maybe. But then again, these are not lines that risk life and limb should they be hit.

And just because those that came before you is no reason to skip following code.

For one, it might not be an utter lack of respect for the code, but someone making a mistake, basically two contractors not properly coordinating. For example, I used to work for the phone company and would hear stories where phone lines would get laid in a new developent, but then a landscape contractor would come through afterwards and dig up the usually shallow phone cables.

I can see similar things happening when it comes to installing other utilities. The utility comes in and installs utilities according to code. But at the time, landscaping was only rough. Final landscaping would then alter the depths of these utilities. But then, a part of trying to keep everyone save is the "Call before you dig" program is so that you'll know where to be careful.

Of course, I'll admit that the other side of the coin is that everyone is trying to get things done on the cheap and things do not get "properly" installed because of shotty work. But from what I've seen of building codes, they somewhat take that sort of thing into account. As an example, a part of the reason most utuilities are supposed to be 18" deep is so that a combination of some shotty installs and later landscaping might at least keep these utilities at a relatively safe depth.

Sunday, September 13th 2009, 12:34pm

by debo

You're bringing up codes again???

Come on, there is a reason these codes have been written. They have been written by people who are experienced with this stuff and know many of the various failure modes. The write the code so that inexperienced twerps like you and me can safely install this stuff and avoid the various failure modes we are not familier with.


So, when you ever find your self questioning why a certain code is in place, that means your in over your head (in terms of the subject matter) and you need to just follow code.

And keep in mind, code isn't written just to safe-guard you. Code is written to help safe-guard the next person that is going to own your house. Say you're going to live in your house forever? Based on what. We've seen what the economy can do... and one day, contrary to what anyone might tell you, you will die. If you haven't demolished the home by them, it will becomes someone else's responsibility.



Again I bring it up since no one follows them. Why you ask..I called my Dig safe people (state law) and they come out and say this is XX inches deep, location etc...They are PER CODE to be all 18 inches deep (min)..Natural gas was 13 inches (found line), cable was 5 inches (found it on my install), phone was 9 (found on my install), water depth was not even close (hit on install)...Again, no one follows the codes, not even city employees.

Out of all issues, only (1) was correct at 4-ft down..

Sunday, September 13th 2009, 1:06am

by HooKooDooKu

You're bringing up codes again???

Come on, there is a reason these codes have been written. They have been written by people who are experienced with this stuff and know many of the various failure modes. The write the code so that inexperienced twerps like you and me can safely install this stuff and avoid the various failure modes we are not familier with.


So, when you ever find your self questioning why a certain code is in place, that means your in over your head (in terms of the subject matter) and you need to just follow code.

And keep in mind, code isn't written just to safe-guard you. Code is written to help safe-guard the next person that is going to own your house. Say you're going to live in your house forever? Based on what. We've seen what the economy can do... and one day, contrary to what anyone might tell you, you will die. If you haven't demolished the home by them, it will becomes someone else's responsibility.

Saturday, September 12th 2009, 8:45pm

by debo

Depth is whatever you want..I know here in my state code is 18 inches and NO ONE follows it. That is natural gas, phone and cable...

Sunday, September 6th 2009, 2:04am

by HooKooDooKu

For mainline pipes (pipes under constant pressure BEFORE the irrigation valves) you really should use Sch 40 and bury it 18" deep or use copper.

After that, you can use the 200psi stuff on latteral lines (pipes AFTER the irrigaion valves). pros will... depending upon the situation. But the 200 is more likely to break at some point in the future. After all, in the long term, you have to worry tree/bush roots, ground shifts, a vehical running it over, sharp rocks in the soil, etc.

In part, it depends upon where you are installing. If you are installing in rock-free soil in areas where there is low propability that anything would ever drive over it, then PVC200 will save a few bucks over the Sch40. But Sch 40 is so common (and therefore so cheap), that unless we're talking about buying thousands of feet of the stuff, the little extra cost of using Sch40 seems well worth it at an insurance policy. A quick look at prices shows that Sch40 is about 15% more. So as a rough price comparision, say Sch40 will average 35 cents per foot. That means the 200 is about 30 cents per foot. If you need 1000' of pipe, you will save about $50 on pipe that cost $350 on a job (the entire system) that will likly cost more than $3500 (depending upon how much DIY happens). You still buy the same pipe fittings, valves, valve boxes, sprinkler heads, etc. Suddenly, it doesn't sound like trying to save $50 so that you can use thin-wall oioe sounds like a great cost savings... especially if you are installing it yourself. If you are going at this as a DIY, then I would think you want the stronger pipe to help offset your lack of experience burying pipe.

Saturday, September 5th 2009, 3:54pm

by osunas2000

PVC piping

?( I am installing a new sprinkler system and I hae to ask... Is it necessary to install sch. 40 pvc pipe. Would I I be able to use regular pvc with a rating of 200 PSi?