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The last 7 posts

Friday, September 2nd 2005, 6:45pm

by Jazzer K

I would go with the 100psi. if it never gets close to that pressure, but if you think you might someday put on a pump then deffinatly go bigger to handle that pressure.

Sunday, June 19th 2005, 1:15pm

by RidgeRun05

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"> For constant-pressure mainlines, sure, but for individual zones it would be overkill.

In any case, one does best to buy the pipe from an irrigation distributor, because they don't take chances on the quality of their supply. Home improvement stores don't have to live up to the same standards, because they aren't in danger of losing a professional clientel.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
Totally agreed.

Sunday, June 19th 2005, 12:19pm

by Wet_Boots

For constant-pressure mainlines, sure, but for individual zones it would be overkill.

In any case, one does best to buy the pipe from an irrigation distributor, because they don't take chances on the quality of their supply. Home improvement stores don't have to live up to the same standards, because they aren't in danger of losing a professional clientel.

Sunday, June 19th 2005, 9:20am

by RidgeRun05

It is a good replacement for PVC mainlines under constant pressure, which is what I use it for.

Sunday, June 19th 2005, 9:03am

by Wet_Boots

A good quality of regular 100 psi poly from an irrigation distributor is more than enough for a sprinkler system fed from a 75 psi water supply. The irrigation supplies sell miles of the utility grade pipe for every foot of 160 psi pipe (if they even stock any)

No pro uses 160 psi pipe in sprinkler system zones. It is most commonly used for deep well applications. If a sprinkler guy was installing poly pipe that would be under constant pressure, with shut-off valves on it, then that line might see pressures higher than the supply pressure, because of water hammer, and 160 psi (or higher) could be used.

Saturday, June 18th 2005, 6:47pm

by RidgeRun05

I would go with the 160 PSI just as cheap insurance, if nothing else, for the thickness of it. It is not too much more expensive, and it also doesn't kink during install with the vibratory plow like the cheap pipe can. I buy all my products from John Deere Landscapes.

Saturday, June 18th 2005, 10:02am

by seaverd

100 psi versus 160 psi poly pipe

I am about to install a sprinkler system at my home and would like some advice as to which poly pipe I should purchase. My static pressure fluctuates between 65 and 75 psi. Should I use 100psi rated poly pipe or should I spend the extra money and buy 160 psi poly? I live in upstate New York so freezing is an issue. I understand that I will have to blow out the system for the winter - I am just curious if it is worth the extra money for the thicker walled pipe.

Also, where do most of you purchase your pipe?? An irrigation distributer or home improvement centers?

Thanks in advance,

Dan