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The last 4 posts

Tuesday, May 5th 2009, 5:33pm

by rschroeder

RE: Codes

On a similar subject, I am about to embark on installing a system to supply irrigation over about 3 acres of homesite. The water source will be a well which is currently not connected to the house, but is drilled into the same water sand/strata that supplies the community. Since I do not want to ultimately contaminate the well and thereby cause potential for contaminating the entire community's water supply, I want to install some type of backflow preventer device. We live in Port Alto TX. Any suggestions or ideas about which type valve might be acceptable for this area. Like you all said, I may have to call the local gov offices/building inspectors to get the lowdown, but any input would be appreciated.
Many municipalities have a building permit / inspection office. They have all the info you should need. Home sprinkler systems here rquire a permit. They inspect to make sure you have a properly functioning backflow protector, and here they require it to have a yearly check by a certified tester. Jeff

Thursday, July 31st 2008, 12:43am

by Lowvolumejeff

Codes

Many municipalities have a building permit / inspection office. They have all the info you should need. Home sprinkler systems here rquire a permit. They inspect to make sure you have a properly functioning backflow protector, and here they require it to have a yearly check by a certified tester. Jeff

Wednesday, July 30th 2008, 3:07pm

by HooKooDooKu

Start by trying to find building inspectors for where you live. If you live in the city, your city likely has building inspectors responsible for the oversite of building permits. You could try to contact one of them as they are likely to know what are the building codes in your area.

If you are on a public water system, you could also begin by asking someone in the water works department. They might either know the answer, or perhaps can direct you to the person who likely knows the building codes in your area.

The next step might be to find a friend, or a friend of a friend of a local certified plumber. They too are likely to know the local building codes.

Tuesday, July 29th 2008, 1:31pm

by foxsam

Determining code requirements.

I was wondering how to figure out the code requirements in my area. any searches i tried did not help me figure it out. Anyone who i know in my area that has a sprinkler does not have a backflow preventer that i know of. also any houses i pass by do not have any visible on the outside.

on a second point would this be worth anything or is it so bad that better off with nothing. http://www.lawnbeltusa.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=71 - it is an anti-siphon



thanks.



PS great website (http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com) by the way. when i plan what and how I am setting up i will definitely buy from here what they sell that I need.